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MUSIC GRADE 12 - EXAMINATION GUIDELINES 2021

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MUSIC
EXAMINATION GUIDELINES
GRADE 12
2021

TABLE OF CONTENTS  Page 
1.INTRODUCTION  3
2. ASSESSMENT IN GRADE 12
2.1 Format of the Music papers
2.2 Practical performance examinations
2.2.1 Organisation
2.2.2 Conduct during the examinations
2.2.3 Standardisation of the examination
2.3 Taxonomy
4
4
9
9
9
9
10
3.FOUNDATIONAL KNOWLEDGE
3.1 Practical component (Topic 1)
3.2 Written examination Paper 1
3.3 Music comprehension Paper 2

12
12
12
4.QUALITY OF CONTENT, THE USE OF LANGUAGE AND PRESENTATION 13
5.ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
5.1 Technical work
Sample of Technical Assessment
5.2 Sight-reading
5.3 Aural Tests
Sample of Aural Assessment: For Examiner
Sample of Aural Assessment: Answer Sheet for Candidate
5.4 Performance pieces

14
14
18

19

21
6.CONCLUSION 22

1. INTRODUCTION
The Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for Engineering Graphics and Design outlines the nature and purpose of the subject Engineering Graphics and Design. This guides the philosophy underlying the teaching and assessment of the subject in Grade 12.
The purpose of these Examination Guidelines is to:

  • Provide clarity on the depth and scope of the content to be assessed in the Grade 12 National Senior Certificate (NSC) Examination in Engineering Graphics and Design.
  • Assist teachers to adequately prepare learners for the NSC examinations.

This document deals with the final Grade 12 external examinations. It does not deal in any depth with the School-based Assessment (SBA), Performance Assessment Tasks (PATs) or final external practical examinations as these are clarified in a separate PAT document which is updated annually.
These Examination Guidelines should be read in conjunction with:

  • The National Curriculum Statement (NCS) Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS): Engineering Graphics and Design
  • The National Protocol of Assessment: An addendum to the policy document, the National Senior Certificate: A qualification at Level 4 on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF), regarding the National Protocol for Assessment (Grades R–12)
  • The national policy pertaining to the programme and promotion requirements of the National Curriculum Statement, Grades R–12

The following tables provide an overview of the assessment of Music as a subject:

Topic  Marks
Practical examinations   
Topic 1 Music Performance and Improvisation  150
Written examinations   
Topics 2 and 3
Paper 1 Music Literacy and General Music Knowledge
Paper 2 Music Comprehension 
120
30
 TOTAL MARK 300

 

Practical Examinations

  Marks 
Technical development (scales and study) or
Technical development (two studies) 
10 + 20 = 30 or
15 + 15 = 30
Performance pieces 3 x 30 = 90 
Sight-Reading  15
Aural tests  15
TOTAL  30


2. ASSESSMENT IN GRADE 12
2.1 Format of the Music papers
MUSIC PAPER 1: MUSIC LITERACY AND GENERAL MUSIC KNOWLEDGE
SECTIONS A, B and C/D/E (120 MARKS)

  • The duration of the paper is three hours. Approximately one and a half hours should be devoted to Section A (Topic 2 – Music Literacy) and approximately one and a half hours should be devoted to Sections B and C/D/E (Topic 3 – General Music Knowledge).
  • In the GMK section candidates must only answer questions from one stream (Section C or D or E).
  • Candidates are not allowed access to a musical instrument during the examination.

SECTION A: MUSIC LITERACY (60 MARKS) - Compulsory
Question 1: Theory of Music (15 marks)

  • Questions on the Theory of Music will be based on a variety of musical scores.
  • Short questions, not related to the score, may also be asked.
  • Basic foundational knowledge are essential building blocks for the Grade 12 work.
    • These include all simple and compound time signatures, irregular time signatures 5/4 and 7/4, all note values as well as triplets and duplets, key signatures and accidentals, all clefs, technical names, elements of music (tone colour, duration (metre, rhythm, tempo), pitch (melody, tonality, harmony), dynamics, texture, structure, mood and atmosphere).
  • Refer to Topic 2 of CAPS (Grade 12) for Theory of Music content.
    • Intervals: all simple and compound; inversions
    • Key signatures: in all four clefs; all accidentals
    • Rhythm and metre: all simple, compound and the irregular time signatures 5/4 and 7/4; correct grouping
    • Note values: all note values as well as triplets and duplets; all rests
    • Scales:
      • Major and all minors (natural, harmonic and melodic)
      • Chromatic scales: any construction acceptable
      • Pentatonic scales: major and minor pentatonic versions
      • Melodic minor modes (Jazz): only I, V and VII
    • Terminology:
      • Prescribed terms for Grade 12 only
      • Technical names of scale degrees

Question 2: Composition (15 marks)

  • Candidates will be required to create a melody for melodic instrument or voice.
  • The melody can be in a major or minor key.
  • Length: 12 bars in ABA form
  • Material: The following might be given:
    • An opening motive
    • Rhythmic pattern
  • Notation: The following musical notations may be used:
    • Staff notation
    • Tonic-solfa may be used if the melody is for voice without text.
  • Articulation indications: These must be used correctly on the score. Dynamic indications may be added.

Question 3: Harmonic Analysis (15 marks)

  • Questions on harmonic analysis will be based on a variety of musical scores.
  • Refer to Topic 2 of CAPS (Grade 12) for Theory of Music content.
  • All answers must be accompanied by appropriate figuring of the chords (Roman numerals for four-part harmony (WAM or IAM) and chord symbols for instrumental pieces/ excerpts/examples (JAZZ or IAM)).
  • Candidates may be required to complete a cadence, add non-chordal notes, etc.

Question 4: Harmonisation (15 marks)

  • Candidates will be required to harmonise a given soprano melody by adding three vocal parts (alto, tenor and bass), or to complete an instrumental piece in jazz style of which the melodic line is given.
  • Answers may be accompanied by appropriate figuring of the chords (Roman numerals for four-part harmony (WAM or IAM) and chord symbols for instrumental pieces (JAZZ or IAM)).

SECTION B: GENERAL MUSIC KNOWLEDGE (10 MARKS) - Compulsory
Question 5: South African Music Industry (10 marks)

  • Candidates will be required to answer short or longer questions on the South African music industry.
  • Refer to Topic 3 of CAPS (Grade 12) for South African music industry content.

SECTION C: INDIGENOUS AFRICAN MUSIC (50 MARKS) – Chosen Stream
Note the following important aspects:

  • Research the history of modern IAM topics:
  • Migrant Labour System (MLS) and its influence on the development of music
  • Development of African Jazz in relation to international trends
  • Timeframe for modern constructs:
    • Marabi
    • Kwela
    • Isicathamiya
    • Maskandi
    • Mbaqanga
    • Malombo jazz
  • Metaphors of music and life in indigenous African societies:
    • African drumming
    • African dance
    • Children's music/dance
    • Rituals
    • Divinity
  • Content as given in the CAPS
  • Modern Constructs
  • Prescribed works will be provided in a separate document by the Directorate of Curriculum Management.

The section will have the following types of questions on the given descriptions:
Short questions (20 marks)

  • Terms/Terminology
  • All styles and genres as mentioned in CAPS
  • An in-depth study of two prescribed works per style
  • While the focus is on the prescribed work for each artist/group, learners are expected to listen to a wide variety of music from the prescribed styles.

Paragraphs/Comparisons/Brief notes/Tables etc. (15 marks)

  • All styles and genres as mentioned in CAPS
  • An in-depth study of two prescribed works per style
  • While the focus is on the prescribed work for each artist/group, learners are expected to listen to a wide variety of music from the prescribed styles with a view to distinguishing characteristics specific to each style.

Essay (15 marks)

  • All styles and genres as mentioned in CAPS

OR
SECTION D: JAZZ (50 MARKS) – Chosen Stream
Note the following important aspects:

  • Definitions, elements, and characteristics of all genres
  • Short biography of composers, artists, or groups
  • Prescribed works will be provided in a separate document by the Directorate of Curriculum Management.

Short questions (20 marks)

  • Terms/Terminology
  • All styles and genres as mentioned in CAPS
  • An in-depth study of one prescribed work and the relevant artist/group per style
  • While the focus is on the prescribed work for each artist/group, learners are expected to listen to a wide variety of music from the prescribed styles with a view to distinguishing characteristics specific to each style.

Paragraphs/Comparisons/Brief notes/Tables etc. (15 marks)

  • All styles and genres as mentioned in CAPS
  • An in-depth study of one prescribed work and the relevant artist/group per style
  • While the focus is on the prescribed work for each artist/group, learners are expected to listen to a wide variety of music from the prescribed styles with a view to distinguishing characteristics specific to each style.

Essay (15 marks)

  • All styles and genres as mentioned in CAPS

OR

SECTION E: WESTERN ART MUSIC (50 MARKS) – Chosen Stream
Note the following important aspects:

  • Definitions of all genres (symphony, symphonic poem, concert overture and opera) and sub-genres (comic opera, Singspiel, serious opera, aria, recitative, etc.)
  • The layout of an orchestral score
  • Development of the symphony orchestra and instrumentation (Baroque orchestra, Mannheim, standard Classical orchestra)
  • Summary of the historic development of the opera (Camerata, Monteverdi, Gluck)
  • Prescribed works will be provided in a separate document by the Directorate of Curriculum Management.

Short questions (20 marks)

  • Terms/Terminology
  • Symphony, symphonic poem, and concert overture
  • Opera and development of opera (Camerata, Monteverdi, Gluck)
  • Form analysis: sonata form, Minuet and Trio, and rondo form
  • Development of the symphony orchestra and instrumentation (Baroque orchestra, Mannheim, standard Classical orchestra)

Paragraphs/Comparisons/Brief notes/Tables etc. (15 marks)

  • Symphony, symphonic poem, and concert overture
  • Opera and development of opera (Camerata, Monteverdi, Gluck)
  • Form analysis: sonata form, Minuet and Trio, and rondo form
  • Development of orchestra and instrumentation (Baroque orchestra, Mannheim, Standard Classical orchestra)

Essay (15 marks)

  • All styles and genres as mentioned in CAPS

MUSIC PAPER 2: MUSIC COMPREHENSION
SECTIONS A, B AND C (30 MARKS)

  • The duration of the paper is one and a half hours.
  • In Paper 2 all candidates will be expected to respond to music of a variety of styles and traditions.
  • This paper will be written while candidates listen to soundtracks on an official examination CD.
  • Every Grade 12 examination centre will be provided with an audio CD, which must be played to the candidates during the final examination.
  • If a school offers more than one stream (IAM, JAZZ, WAM), the following guidelines should be followed:
    • Each stream/choice should be written in a separate venue.
    • Each venue should be equipped with suitable sound equipment.
    • Each venue should have its own CD. (Department should be informed of the required number of CDs in time.)
  • An invigilator should be present in each venue.
  • The CD must be tested by the chief invigilator at least one week before the examination takes place. It should be tested on the same equipment to be used during the examination.
  • The Music teacher may not be present during the testing of the CD.
  • During the examination, the invigilator/Music teacher must play the tracks the required number of times, according to the instructions in the paper. Enough time between questions must be allowed for the candidates to complete their answers.
  • Basic foundational knowledge are essential building blocks for understanding Grade 12 work.
    • These include all simple and compound time signatures, all note values, key signatures, elements of music (tone colour, duration [metre, rhythm, and tempo], pitch [melody, tonality, and harmony], dynamics, texture, structure, mood and atmosphere) and compositional techniques.

SECTION A: AURAL RECOGNITION (10 MARKS) - Compulsory
The following types of questions may be asked:

  • Rhythmic dictation
  • Rhythmic and melodic dictation
  • Recognition of intervals, scales, non-harmonic notes, chords, cadences, compositional techniques, instruments, genres, elements of music

SECTION B: RECOGNITION OF CONCEPTS (12 MARKS) – Chosen Stream
There will be choice questions for the IAM, JAZZ and WAM streams:

  • Questions will be asked on genres, style periods, instruments and voice types.
  • This includes prescribed musical styles/composers/artists, musical forms, style characteristics, and elements of music.

SECTION C: FORM ANALYSIS (8 MARKS) - Compulsory

  • Questions will be asked on one of the following form structures:
    • Binary form (AB)
    • Ternary form (ABA)
    • AABA
    • Twelve-bar Blues
    • Verse and chorus form
    • Basic African forms: call and response, solo songs, mixed structural forms
  • A music score will be provided in the examination. Candidates must be able to indicate the main sections, keys, cadences and compositional techniques on the score. Other form- related questions, requiring a written response, may also be asked.

2.2 Practical Performance Examinations
2.2.1 Organisation

  • The final practical examinations take place from August to the end of October.  These examinations are assessed by a panel of at least two, preferably three examiners, consisting of a moderator (subject advisor) and one or two instrumental specialists (teachers) unless there are extraordinary circumstances, in which case the schools will be informed of the examination model to be used.
  • Candidates may not be examined by teachers from their own schools (including external instrumental teachers) but may be accompanied by such teachers. Accompanists may only be present in the examination venue for the actual performance of the relevant piece(s).
  • The Music teacher of the school or the instrumental teacher may attend the examination as an observer, but may not discuss or know the marks.
  • No marks may be divulged to the teacher, instrumental teacher or the parent. All practical marks must be treated with strict confidentiality like all written papers in all subjects.
  • A timetable is set up in consultation with the school and the provincial department by the provincial co-ordinator.
  • An attendance register must be signed by all candidates on the day of the examination.
  • All aspects of the examination are assessed during a session of approximately 30–40 minutes per candidate.
  • The examination venue need not be on the school premises but must be suitably equipped and silence must be maintained around the venue.
  • Candidates must be dressed in their school uniforms.
  • All documentation, e.g. aural tests and sight-reading samples will be provided by the provincial department.

2.2.2 Conduct during the examinations

  • Examiners and candidates must arrive at the examination venue at least 30 minutes before the starting time.
  • Candidates must provide a copy of an official scale list for the scales and technical work.
  • Candidates must provide an original published score and two copies of all the pieces in their chosen repertoire.
  • Candidates must provide a copy of their IDs on entering the examination venue.

2.2.3 Standardisation of the examinations

Teachers must ensure that the standard of the chosen repertoire is at an acceptable level. Level descriptors can be found on page 11 paragraph 2.6 of the CAPS document. Any uncertainties about the required standard should be followed up with the provincial subject advisor at the beginning of the Grade 12 year. Presenting pieces below this standard will result in proportional penalisation calculated as follows:

Intermediate Level (Higher)  Grade IV  Mark × 4/5 
Intermediate Level (Lower) Grade III Mark × 3/5
Elementary Level (Higher) Grade II Mark × 2/5
Elementary Level (Lower) Grade I  Mark × 1/5 
  • Candidates offering more than one instrument may choose to do their technical work and sight-reading on any of their instruments.
  • Candidates offering voice must prepare all the prescribed technical exercises, of which five will be assessed plus one vocal study. Alternatively, candidates may choose to present two vocal studies and omit technical exercises.
  • Candidates offering African instruments or percussion must prepare all the prescribed technical exercises/rudiments, of which five will be assessed plus one study. Alternatively, candidates may choose to present two studies and omit the technical exercises.
  • A study can be any independent, complete piece of music that improves a musical skill (expression, tone production, technique etc.). The title does not need to include the words study, etude or exercise, and it may be accompanied (in case of a single line instrument).
  • The standard of the studies must be at an Advanced Level (Grade V).
  • In each stream (IAM, Jazz and WAM) candidates will do a sight-reading test in the examination.
  • Candidates will be given up to one minute preparation time during which they have to study the sight-reading piece without making any sound with their instruments/voices.
  • Aural tests will be provided by the provincial department and will include three different tests: sight-singing, clapping a rhythm and singing of triads (including singing of chords for IAM and JAZZ).
  • Sample assessments follow later in the document.

2.3 Taxonomy

  • Varying cognitive levels will be reflected in all written papers according to the following ratios.
30%  Low-level questions (Levels 1 and 2) 
40% Medium-level questions (Levels 3 and 4)
30% High-level questions (Levels 5 and 6)

The table below gives an indication of the different levels at which questions may be set.

Knowledge  Comprehension    Application  Analysis   Evaluation  Creation 
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  •  Define
  • Describe
  • Find
  • Identify
  • List
  • Listen
  • Match
  • Name
  • Notate
  • Recognise
  • Select
  • State
  • Classify
  • Demonstrate
  • Describe
  • Discuss
  • Do
  • Explain
  • Give examples
  • Illustrate
  • Indicate
  • Outline
  • Summarise
  •  Apply
  • Change
  • Choose
  • Compare
  • Complete
  • Construct
  • Contrast
  • Determine
  • Figuring of chords
  • Notate
  • Order
  • Show
  • Use
  •  Analyse
  • Classify
  • Comment
  • Compare
  • Critique
  • Discriminate
  • Distinguish
  • Explain
  • Figure chords
  • Infer
  • Interpret
  • Select
  • Separate
  • Study
  •  Assess
  • Convince
  • Debate
  • Examine
  • Find errors
  • Judge
  • Recommend
  • Compose

NOTE: The level of difficulty of questions will not be determined by the verb used – rather by the context of the question/content asked.

GUIDELINES FOR USING VERBS WHEN SETTING A QUESTION
Level 1

List  State in the briefest form, e.g.
Name two maskandi artists/performers 
Name Label something, e.g.
Name the composer of the Pastoral Symphony 
Identify Single out an item hidden among other information, e.g.
Identify the type of non-chordal note 
Describe Give a brief account of something, e.g.
Describe the instruments used in a performance of Pata Pata by Miriam Makeba 
Define Give the exact meaning of a term or concept, e.g.
Define an overture 

Level 2

Explain  Make something clear, e.g.
Explain what maskandi is in your own words 
Summarise Give a shortened version of essential facts, e.g.
Write a short summary of the story line of the Magic Flute
Outline Give the bare essentials, e.g.
Give an outline of the history of Cape jazz
Do Follow an instruction, e.g.
Write down the major scale which has four sharps

Level 3

Compare/ Contrast

Show how concepts/styles/works are alike or different, e.g.
Compare the style characteristics of Abdullah Ibrahim and Robbie Jansen 

Use Utilise information in order to clarify meaning, e.g.
Use the following list of elements to write a paragraph on the style characteristics of Mozart 
Apply Use knowledge and understanding to clarify, e.g.
Rewrite the following melody in the relative minor key 

Level 4

Discriminate  Tell the difference between concepts, e.g.
Show the difference between the exposition and the recapitulation in the sonata 
Distinguish  Identify the characteristics which indicate difference, e.g.
What is the difference between a programme symphony and a symphonic poem? 
Critique  Give an opinion on solid factual grounds, e.g.
How do the characteristics of African jazz manifest in this piece? 
Analyse  Break down into constituent parts to be able to understand, e.g. Analyse the form of the following song/aria 
Figure chords  Describe chords and progression, e.g.
Provide figuring for the chords in bars 5 and 6 by writing the key, chord and position (inversion) 

Level 5

Assess Make a statement on the quality, e.g.
Assess the stylistic accuracy of the following jazz solo 
Examine  Make an in-depth study of a certain aspect, e.g.
How does the texture of this composition vary between bars 12 and 20? 
Debate  Write about something from more than one perspective, e.g. Debate, in your own words, if Beethoven can be considered a Classical or Romantic composer 

Level 6

Compose  Create new music, e.g.
Compose a melody using the given opening 
Harmonisation  Harmonise or write an accompaniment for a given melody, e.g. Write an accompaniment for the following piano melody 
Opinion  Give a substantiated view of a work or performance, e.g.
Give two reasons why you regard this performance as aesthetically pleasing or not 

3. FOUNDATIONAL KNOWLEDGE
3.1 Practical (Topic 1)
The prior knowledge acquired and skills developed up to Grade 12 are absolutely essential for the successful presentation of Music as a subject in the final year of study.
Candidates cannot start with Music as a subject in Grade 12 unless they have already acquired the required practical performance skills.
3.2 Written Examination: Paper 1 (Topic 2 and Topic 3)
Music Literacy (Topic 2), by its very nature, is accumulative in the FET phase. Therefore, the content of the Music Literacy section of the paper will include foundational knowledge.
General Music Knowledge (Topic 3) includes the study of the music industry which is compulsory for all three streams. The specific questions of the three streams (IAM, JAZZ, WAM) will be asked from the Grade 12 content. It is important, however, that candidates have a general knowledge of the basic elements of music, styles of music, instruments and form.
3.3 Music Comprehension: Paper 2
All skills and application of knowledge acquired in Grades 10 and 11 will be assessed together with the new content knowledge acquired in Grade 12.
4. QUALITY OF CONTENT, THE USE OF LANGUAGE AND PRESENTATION
Presentation

  • Music Literacy and Aural questions containing music notation must be answered in pencil and must be clear and unambiguous.
  • All other questions must be answered in blue or black ink.
  • Where form analysis is done, the conventions of form analysis must be followed, e.g. sections indicated above the score, key and chords below the score and compositional techniques in the score.

Types of answers in General Music Knowledge

  • Answers should present relevant information in full sentences with correct spelling, punctuation and grammar.
  • Single-word answers or bullet form should only be used when specifically requested.
  • Answers presented in paragraph format must be coherent and logical.
  • Essay-type questions must include an introductory paragraph, body (containing one or more paragraphs) and a concluding paragraph. Marks will be awarded for correct use of this essay format.

5. ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
The assessment criteria for technical work, sight-reading and performance pieces are provided below.
5.1 Technical assessment
OPTION 1: WESTERN INSTRUMENTS
Candidates must prepare all the scales and arpeggios of a recognised examination body's list. Examiners will choose scales and arpeggios according to the list below.
SCALES AND ARPEGGIOS
(2 MARKS EACH)
Scales and Arpeggios
1. Major scale: ___________________
2. Minor scale: ___________________
3. Chromatic scale: ___________________
4. Major arpeggio: ___________________
5. Minor arpeggio: ___________________
TOTAL _______________
10
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA OF TECHNICAL WORK
5 x 2 = 10

2 Fluent, accurate and even with a competent technical facility
High quality of tone and secure intonation
Prompt response 
1½  Technically secure with occasional errors resulting from stress
Quality of tone and intonation mostly reliable
Generally prompt responses 
1 Mostly fluent but some unevenness of technique
Some degree of variety in quality of tone and intonation
Hesitant and uncertain responses with occasional restarts 
½  Limited knowledge of the structure with frequent errors in notes and technically incompetent
Poor tone quality and intonation
Frequent restarts and little concept of key 
 0 No sense of fluency
Many serious errors
No sense of structure 


The assessment criteria for the study are on page 16.

TECHNICAL WORK   
  MAXIMUM MARK MARK AWARDED 
SCALES AND ARPEGGIOS   10  
STUDY   20  
TOTAL   30  

TWO studies may replace the Scales/Technical exercises and ONE study.

OPTION 2: VOICE AND PERCUSSION/IAM INSTRUMENTS

VOICE: TWO STUDIES   
  MAXIMUM MARK  MARK AWARDED 
STUDY 1  15  
STUDY 2 15  
TOTAL 30  


OR

PERCUSSION/AFRICAN INSTRUMENTS   
  MAXIMUM MARK  MARK AWARDED 
STUDY 1   15  
STUDY 2   15  
TOTAL   30  


OR
OPTION 3: VOICE AND PERCUSSION/AFRICAN INSTRUMENTS
VOICE AND PERCUSSION/AFRICAN INSTRUMENTS
(2 MARKS EACH)
Scales/Arpeggios/Rudiments/Exercises
1. ___________________
2. ___________________
3. ___________________
4. ___________________
5. ___________________
TOTAL _______________
10

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA OF TECHNICAL WORK
5 x 2 = 10

2 Fluent, accurate and even with a competent technical facility
High quality of tone and secure intonation
Prompt response 
1½  Technically secure with occasional errors resulting from stress
Quality of tone and intonation mostly reliable
Generally prompt responses 
1 Mostly fluent but some unevenness of technique
Some degree of variety in quality of tone and intonation
Hesitant and uncertain responses with occasional restarts 
½  Limited knowledge of the structure with frequent errors in notes and technically incompetent
Poor tone quality and intonation
Frequent restarts and little concept of key 
 0 No sense of fluency
Many serious errors
No sense of structure 

The assessment criteria for the study are on page 16.

TECHNICAL WORK   
  MAXIMUM MARK MARK AWARDED 
SCALES AND ARPEGGIOS   10  
STUDY   20  
TOTAL   30  

TWO studies may replace the Scales/Technical exercises and ONE study.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA FOR STUDY

FLUENCY; ACCURACY
20 
STYLISTIC SENSE
20 
GENERAL
20 
(18–20)
EXCELLENT
Accurate, fluent and precise playing 
(18–20)
EXCELLENT
Clear understanding of the required style 
(18–20)
EXCELLENT
Excellent tone production, touch, intonation, technical competence and suitable tempo 
(14–17)
GOOD
Mainly accurate and fluent playing
(14–17)
GOOD
Good sense of performance in
appropriate style
(14–17)
GOOD
Good tone production, touch, intonation, technical competence and tempo
(10–13)
AVERAGE
Essentially accurate with adequate fluency 
(10–13)
AVERAGE
A fair sense of the required style 
(10–13)
AVERAGE
Fair tone production, touch, intonation, technical competence and tempo
(6–9)
ACCEPTABLE
Tentative tempo, pulse often not clear, frequent hesitations; limited level of accuracy 
(6–9)
ACCEPTABLE
Performance shaky and lacking a sense of style
(6–9)
ACCEPTABLE
Some idea of tone production, touch, intonation, technical competence and tempo
(0-5)
UNACCEPTABLE
Very poor continuity with frequent stumbles, restarts and/or stoppages; very little accuracy; many errors 
(0-5)
UNACCEPTABLE
Style just vaguely discernible
(0-5)
UNACCEPTABLE
Lacking tone production, touch, intonation, technical competence and tempo
 60 marks ÷ 3 = 20 marks (Options 1 and 3) OR 60 marks ÷ 4 = 15 marks (Option 2)  


5.2 Sight-reading
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA FOR SIGHT-READING

STYLE AND INTERPRETATION 5   ACCURACY 5  FLUENCY 5
(5)
EXCELLENT
Musically persuasive, convincing shaping of phrases, artful articulation and dynamics 
(5)
EXCELLENT
Accurate reading of notes and rests
(5)
EXCELLENT
Consistent and suitable tempo, fluent performance
(4)
GOOD
Some understanding of phrasing, articulation and dynamics 
(4)
GOOD
Mostly accurate reading of notes and rests,
(4)
GOOD
Tempo largely maintained
(3)
ACCEPTABLE
Satisfactory control of some aspects of musical style 
(3)
ACCEPTABLE
Acceptable level of accuracy in reading of notes and rests
(3)
ACCEPTABLE
Acceptable tempo, although somewhat slow, fluency acceptable
(2)
WEAK
Little attention to details of musical interpretation
(2)
WEAK
Mostly inaccurate reading of notes and rests
(2)
WEAK
Inconsistent tempo, far too slow, fluency flawed
(0–1)
UNACCEPTABLE
No attention to musical detail 
(0–1)
UNACCEPTABLE
Performance abandoned or curtailed
(0–1)
UNACCEPTABLE
Static tempo, no fluency 
 Total: 15 marks  


5.3 Aural assessment
SAMPLE: AURAL ASSESSMENT
AURAL COMPONENT (15)
QUESTION PAPER FOR EXAMINER ONLY
1. Sight-singing
(Learner may study sight-singing for 30 seconds. Adjust doh if necessary.) (6)

1
2. Play the music phrase twice. The candidate must clap the rhythm. (6)

2
3. Singing of triads/chords (3)
triads
TOTAL: 15

SAMPLE: AURAL ASSESSMENT
AURAL COMPONENT (15)
ANSWER SHEET FOR CANDIDATE ONLY
1. Sight-singing
(Learner may study sight-singing for 30 seconds. Adjust doh if necessary.) (6)

sightseeing 1
Mark:____
2. Clapping the rhythm (6)
Mark:____
3. Singing of triads/chords
3.1 ____________________
3.2 ____________________
(3)
Mark: ____
TOTAL: 15
5.4 Performance Pieces

  • Each candidate must present three pieces of varying styles, tempos and character.
  • At least one of the pieces must be an ensemble work. See below:
IAM   JAZZ  WAM 
Piece 1
Own choice (solo piece/ improvisation/ensemble) (30) 
Piece 1
Own choice (solo piece/ improvisation/ensemble) (30) 
Piece 1
Own choice (solo piece) (30) 
Piece 2
Own choice (solo piece/ensemble) (30)
Piece 2
Own choice (solo piece/ensemble) (30)
Piece 2
Own choice (solo piece/ensemble) (30)
Piece 3
Ensemble (30) 
Piece 3
Ensemble (30)
Piece 3
Ensemble (30)
  • For the purposes of this examination an ensemble must consist of 2–8 persons. Each performer must play an independent part which must not be doubled by any other performer's part.
  • If an adult or teacher performs with the candidate, at least one other learner must be part of the ensemble.
  • Ensemble works played by more than two Grade 12 candidates must be played as many times as deemed necessary by the examiner.
  • Improvisation may form part of any of the pieces, but a lead sheet must be provided for the examiner's convenience.
  • Candidates who present pieces at a higher standard than the required minimum level will be assessed at the specific standard. They will therefore not be advantaged unless they perform the pieces with technical competence, accurate characterisation and stylistic insight. This means that the candidate who presents pieces at a higher level, but plays them inadequately, will be assessed in the same way as a candidate who plays inadequately at the minimum level.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA FOR PREPARED PIECES AND ENSEMBLE

FLUENCY; ACCURACY
20 
STYLISTIC SENSE
20 
GENERAL
20 
(18–20)
EXCELLENT
Accurate, fluent and precise playing 
(18–20)
EXCELLENT
Clear understanding of the required style 
(18–20)
EXCELLENT
Excellent tone production, touch, intonation, technical competence and suitable tempo 
(14–17)
GOOD
Mainly accurate and fluent playing
(14–17)
GOOD
Good sense of performance in
appropriate style
(14–17)
GOOD
Good tone production, touch, intonation, technical competence and tempo
(10–13)
AVERAGE
Essentially accurate with adequate fluency 
(10–13)
AVERAGE
A fair sense of the required style 
(10–13)
AVERAGE
Fair tone production, touch, intonation, technical competence and tempo
(6–9)
ACCEPTABLE
Tentative tempo, pulse often not clear, frequent hesitations; limited level of accuracy 
(6–9)
ACCEPTABLE
Performance shaky and lacking a sense of style
(6–9)
ACCEPTABLE
Some idea of tone production, touch, intonation, technical competence and tempo
(0-5)
UNACCEPTABLE
Very poor continuity with frequent stumbles, restarts and/or stoppages; very little accuracy; many errors 
(0-5)
UNACCEPTABLE
Style just vaguely discernible
(0-5)
UNACCEPTABLE
Lacking tone production, touch, intonation, technical competence and tempo
60 marks for each piece ÷ 2 = 30 marks per piece x 3 = 90 marks


6. CONCLUSION
This Examination Guidelines document is meant to articulate the assessment aspirations espoused in the CAPS document. It is therefore not a substitute for the CAPS document and educators should teach to the entire CAPS document.
Qualitative curriculum coverage as enunciated in the CAPS cannot be over-emphasised.

Last modified on Monday, 28 June 2021 06:44