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OFFICIAL LANGUAGES: SECOND ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE GRADE 12 - EXAMINATION GUIDELINES 2021

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OFFICIAL LANGUAGES: SECOND ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE
EXAMINATION GUIDELINES
GRADE 12
2021

TABLE OF CONTENTS  Page 
1. INTRODUCTION 3
2. PURPOSE   3
3. PAPER 1 (LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT) 
Format, structure and mark allocation of question papers 
3.1 Cover page
3.2 Instructions and information 
3.3 SECTION A: COMPREHENSION 
3.4 SECTION B: SUMMARY 
3.5 SECTION C: LANGUAGE STRUCTURES AND CONVENTIONS  
4
4
4
4
5
6
8
4. PAPER 2 : LITERATURE  10
4.1 Cover Page 
4.2 Framework for setting Literature 
4.3 Format  
10
10
11
5. PAPER 3: (WRITING) 
Format, structure and mark allocation of question papers 
5.1 Cover page 
5.2 Instructions and information 
5.3 SECTION A: ESSAY 
5.4 SECTION B: LONGER TRANSACTIONAL TEXT 
5.5 SECTION C: SHORTER TRANSACTIONAL TEXT  
13
13
13
13
14
15
16
6.1 APPENDIX A: Assessment rubric: Essay 
6.2 APPENDIX B: Assessment rubric: Longer and shorter transactional
writing 

17

19

7. TYPES OF QUESTIONS AND COGNITIVE LEVELS  20
8. ASSESSMENT IN LANGUAGES 20
9. CONCLUSION 22

1. INTRODUCTION
The Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for Engineering Graphics and Design outlines the nature and purpose of the subject Engineering Graphics and Design. This guides the philosophy underlying the teaching and assessment of the subject in Grade 12.
The purpose of these Examination Guidelines is to:

  • Provide clarity on the depth and scope of the content to be assessed in the Grade 12 National Senior Certificate (NSC) Examination in Engineering Graphics and Design.
  • Assist teachers to adequately prepare learners for the NSC examinations.

This document deals with the final Grade 12 external examinations. It does not deal in any depth with the School-based Assessment (SBA), Performance Assessment Tasks (PATs) or final external practical examinations as these are clarified in a separate PAT document which is updated annually.
These Examination Guidelines should be read in conjunction with:

  • The National Curriculum Statement (NCS) Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS): Engineering Graphics and Design
  • The National Protocol of Assessment: An addendum to the policy document, the National Senior Certificate: A qualification at Level 4 on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF), regarding the National Protocol for Assessment (Grades R–12)
  • The national policy pertaining to the programme and promotion requirements of the National Curriculum Statement, Grades R–12
  • Circular E16 of 2020, Circular E19 of 2018 and Circular S13 of 2013 (Literature)

Disjunctive and Conjunctive Orthography in Languages

DISJUNCTIVE ORTHOGRAPHY   CONJUNCTIVE ORTHOGRAPHY
English
Afrikaans
Sepedi
Sesotho
Setswana
Tshivenda
Xitsonga 
IsiXhosa
IsiNdebele
IsiZulu
Siswati


2. PURPOSE
The purpose of these guidelines is to standardise the setting and marking of examinations in all 11 official languages in respect of:

  • Number of sections
  • Lengths and types of texts
  • Types and levels of questions
  • Allocation of marks
  • Marking guidelines/Assessment rubrics

3. PAPER 1 (LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT)
FORMAT, STRUCTURE AND MARK ALLOCATION OF QUESTION PAPER
3.1 Cover page
The cover page must contain the following information:
subject, level, paper, year, marks, time allocation and number of pages

Second Additional Language
Paper 1
November/June … (year of exam)
Time: 2 hours
Marks: 80
This paper consists of … pages. 

3.2 Instructions and information
This page should contain the following information:

  1. This question paper consists of THREE SECTIONS:
    SECTION A: Comprehension (30)
    SECTION B: Summary (10)
    SECTION C: Language in context (40)
  2. Answer ALL the questions.
  3. Start EACH section on a NEW page.
  4. Rule off after each section.
  5. Number the answers correctly according to the numbering system used in this question paper.
  6. Leave a line after each answer.
  7. Pay special attention to spelling and sentence construction.
  8. Suggested time allocation:
    SECTION A: 45 minutes
    SECTION B: 20 minutes
    SECTION C: 55 minutes
  9. Write neatly and legibly.

3.3 SECTION A: COMPREHENSION (30 marks) QUESTION 1

  • Select TWO texts – ONE prose and ONE visual. No comparative questions should be set.
  • Reading length

Text A (Prose): (24 marks)
Disjunctive orthography: 400–500 words
Conjunctive orthography: 250–300 words
Text B (Visual): (6 marks)
Do not count the words in the visual.
Focus of questions must be on the visual information.
Test comprehension in context.
NOTE:

  • It is not necessary to set comparative questions.
  • There will be one open-ended question in this section.
  • There should be a maximum of 4 multiple-choice questions.

Setting the comprehension questions
When setting questions, the following must be considered:

  • Cognitive demands
    Always start with easy questions, followed by medium and then higher-order questions.
    Various types of questions will be set in such a way that ALL the cognitive levels are catered for in the proportions indicated in each section:
    Levels 1 and 2: 40% of total for section
    Level 3: 40% of total for section
    Levels 4 and 5: 20% of total for section
  • Levels of difficulty
    Questions can be divided into different levels of difficulty within a particular cognitive level.
    Refer to page 18.

Points to consider

  • Texts should be grade and level appropriate.
  • Adapt/Edit text if necessary. Ensure that the text is coherent.
  • Use standard language. Language/Expression should be appropriate in context.
  • Avoid the following: contractions, slang, colloquialisms and vulgar language.
  • Number paragraphs and lines correctly.
  • Written texts must be retyped.
  • Acknowledge the source of a text.
  • As far as possible, questions should follow the sequence of the text.
  • As far as possible, lower-order questions should precede middle- and higher-order questions.
  • Where applicable, questions should explicitly indicate that substantiation/ motivation/justification is required.
  • Characters in visual texts should be clearly identified.
  • In a cartoon, pictures/frames/panels should be clearly numbered.

Marking the comprehension

  • Because the focus is on understanding, incorrect spelling and language errors in responses should not be penalised unless such errors change the meaning/ understanding. (Errors must still be indicated.)
  • If a candidate uses words from a language other than the one being examined, disregard those words, and if the answer still makes sense, do not penalise. However, if a word from another language is used in a text and required in an answer, this will be acceptable.
  • For open-ended questions, no marks should be awarded for YES/NO, or I AGREE/I DISAGREE. Equally no marks should be awarded for TRUE/FALSE or FACT/OPINION. The focus should be on the reason/substantiation/ motivation provided to support/justify the response.
  • When one-word answers are required and the candidate gives a whole sentence, mark the answer as correct provided that the correct word is underlined/highlighted.
  • When two/three facts/points are required and a range is given, mark only the first two/three.
  • Accept local dialectal variations.
  • For multiple-choice questions, accept BOTH the letter corresponding with the correct answer AND/OR the answer written out in full.

3.4 SECTION B: SUMMARY (10 marks)
QUESTION 2

Candidates will be instructed to summarise in point form.
The instruction to candidates to rewrite the summary in their own words must be used with circumspection.
Length of text:
Disjunctive: approximately 200 words
The summary should not exceed 60 words.
Conjunctive: 170 words
The summary should not exceed 50 words.
NOTE: The summary text should not come from the comprehension passage.
Selecting the text and setting the summary

  • The type of text chosen for the summary should afford candidates the opportunity to identify the main points/arguments from the examples which illustrate them.
  • The instructions as to what the candidates must summarise must be clear.
  • It is advisable to provide a context for the passage which candidates must summarise.
  • Heading/Title: Candidates should not be required to provide a heading/title.

Setting the marking guidelines
Provide a table which stipulates the facts as quoted in one column, and the facts as written out in the candidates' own words ('points/own words'), in the other colun, as provided in the template below

  Quotation    Own words/Points 
  1  
2   2  
3   3  
4   4  
5   5  
6   6  
7   7  
       

Marking the summary
Marking is on the basis of the inclusion of valid material and the exclusion of invalid material.
The summary should be marked as follows:

  • Mark allocation:
    • 7 marks for 7 points (1 mark per main point)
    • 3 marks for language
    • Total marks: 10
  • Distribution of language marks when candidate has not quoted verbatim:
    • 1–3 points correct: award 1 mark
    • 4–5 points correct: award 2 marks
    • 6–7 points correct: award 3 marks
  • Distribution of language marks when candidate has quoted verbatim:
    • 6 to 7 quotes: award no language mark
    • 4 to 5 quotes: award a maximum of 1 language mark
    • 2 to 3 quotes: award a maximum of 2 language marks

NOTE:

Word Count:

  • Markers are required to verify the number of words used.
  • Do not deduct any marks if the candidate fails to indicate the number of words used, or if the number of words used is indicated incorrectly. If the word limit is exceeded, read up to the last sentence above the stipulated upper limit and ignore the rest of the summary.
  • SASL - If the time limit is exceeded, "read" up to the last sentence after the stipulated upper time limit and ignore the rest of the summary.

EXAMPLE

Language  Sentence/Phrase     No. of words
ENGLISH   /  walk    2
AFRIKAANS   Ek  loop    2
SEPEDI   Ke  a sepela   3
SESOTHO/SETSWANA   Ke  a tsamaya   3
TSHIVENDA   Ndi   a tshimbila   3
XITSONGA   Mina  ndza famba   3
ISIZULU/SISWATI  Ngiyahamba      1
ISIXHOSA  Ndiyahamba      1
ISINDEBELE  Ngiyakhamba      1
SA SIGN LANGUAGE  Not Applicable 


3.5 SECTION C: LANGUAGE STRUCTURES AND CONVENTIONS (ASSESSED IN CONTEXT) (40 marks)
THREE QUESTIONS as indicated below.
Will test the following:

  • Vocabulary and language use
  • Sentence structures
  • Critical language awareness
  • Editing

QUESTION 3 (10 marks)
Advertisement (combination of visual and written)
Allocation of marks (refer to CAPS):
8 marks on the following:
Persuasive techniques: Emotive language, persuasion, bias, manipulative language
How language and images reflect and shape values and attitudes, images and language that are sexist, biased, ageist, or depend on the reinforcements of stereotypes, especially in advertisements
Impact of use of font types and sizes
2 marks on the following:
Vocabulary development and language use (refer to page 23 and page 24 of the CAPS)
OR
Sentence Structures and the organisation of texts (refer to page 24 and page 25 of the CAPS)

QUESTION 4 (10 marks)
Cartoon: combination of visual and written 1 or 2 cartoon(s) (single and/or multiple frames): 10 marks
8 marks on the following:
Persuasive techniques: Emotive language, persuasion, bias, manipulative language
How language and images reflect and shape values and attitudes, images and language that are sexist, biased, ageist, or depend on the reinforcements of stereotypes
Impact of use of font types and sizes
Analysis, interpretation, evaluation and response to the cartoon or comic strip
2 marks on the following:
Vocabulary development and language use (refer to page 23 and page 24 of the CAPS)

QUESTION 5:
5.1 Prose (14 marks)
Length of text:
Disjunctive: 100–150 words
Conjunctive: 80–100 words
5.2 Picture with a short text (6 marks)
NOTE:
There will be:

  • Two open-ended questions in SECTION C, one in the advertisement and one in the cartoon.
  • A maximum of three multiple-choice questions; one per question.

Setting the questions

  • Questions should follow the sequence of the text.
  • If possible, lower-order questions should precede middle- and higher-order questions.
  • Characters in visual texts should be clearly identified.
  • Pictures/Frames/Panels in cartoons should be clearly numbered.
  • Multiple-choice questions: There should be four options for candidates to choose from.

Marking SECTION C:

  • Spelling:
    • One-word answers must be marked as correct even if the spelling is incorrect, unless the error changes the meaning of the word.
    • In full-sentence answers, incorrect spelling should be penalised if the error is in the language structure being tested.
    • Where an abbreviation is tested, the answer must be punctuated correctly.
  • Sentence structures must be grammatically correct.
  • For multiple-choice questions, accept BOTH the letter corresponding with the correct answer AND/OR the answer written out in full as correct.


4. PAPER 2: LITERATURE
4.1 Cover page
The cover page must contain the following information:
subject, level, paper, year, marks, time allocation and number of pages

Second Additional Language
Paper 2
November/June … (year of exam)
Time: 1 ½ hours
Marks: 40
This paper consists of … pages. 


Instructions and Information Page

  1. This question paper consists of:
    SECTION A: Literature (40 marks)
  1. Answer questions only on ONE genre that you have studied (40 marks).
  2. Start EACH question on a NEW page.
  3. Rule off after each question.
  4. Number the answers correctly according to the numbering system used in this question paper.
  5. Leave a line after each answer.
  6. Pay special attention to spelling and sentence construction.
  7. Suggested time allocation:
    Two question of 20 marks each: 45 minutes per question
  8. Write neatly and legibly.

4.2 Framework for setting the literature
Teachers are to c  onsult Circular E16 of 2020, Circular E19 of 2018 and Circular S13 of 2013 for details about the prescribed literature.
In Second Additional Language, literature is tested in Paper 2 and counts 40 marks. There will be FOUR questions in THIS PAPER and candidates will be required to answer ANY ONE question. CONTEXTUAL questions will be set.
Questions in this paper will be set for the FOUR genres as per the CAPS prescript:
Short Novel (40 marks)
Short Drama (40 marks)
Short Stories (40 marks)
Poetry (40 marks)
Candidates will be required to answer questions based on the ONE genre that they have studied.
NOTE: The format of this paper will differ from one language to the other, based on the number of options available. For example, the English question paper may have questions based on all the genres, while most of the African languages might have questions based on short stories only.
4.3 Format
SHORT NOVEL (40 marks)

  • CONTEXTUAL questions
  • TWO extracts (each set out of 20 marks)

LENGTH OF EXTRACTS
Disjunctive: 100–150 words each
Conjunctive: 80–100 words each
SHORT DRAMA (40 marks)

  • CONTEXTUAL questions
  • TWO extracts (each set out of 20 marks)

LENGTH OF EXTRACTS
Two extracts:
Disjunctive: 100–150 words each
Conjunctive: 80–100 words each

  • Names of speakers should not be counted as part of the extract.
  • Stage directions should be counted as part of the extract.

SHORT STORIES (40 marks)

  • CONTEXTUAL questions
  • TWO short stories (each set out of 20 marks)
  • ONE extract for each story

LENGTH OF EXTRACTS:
Disjunctive: 100–150 words each
Conjunctive: 80–100 words each
POETRY (40 marks)

  • CONTEXTUAL questions
  • TWO poems (each set out of 20 marks)

Instructions for Paper 2

  • The number of marks should serve as a guide to the length of the answer expected.
  • Where applicable, questions should explicitly indicate that substantiation/ motivation/justification is required.
  • Multiple-choice questions must be phrased in the positive.

Questions
When setting questions the following must be considered:

  • Cognitive demands

Always start with lower-order questions, followed by middle-order and then higher-order questions.
Various types of questions will be set in such a way that ALL the cognitive levels are catered for in the proportions indicated in each question.
Levels 1 and 2: 40% of total for section
Level 3: 40% of total for section
Levels 4 and 5: 20% of total for section
Refer to page 18 for the types of questions.

  • Levels of difficulty

Questions can be divided into different levels of difficulty within a particular cognitive level.

Marking guidelines

  • If answers are incorrectly numbered, mark according to the memo.
  • If a spelling error affects the meaning, mark as incorrect. If it does not affect the meaning, mark as correct.
  • If the candidate does not use inverted commas when asked to quote, do not penalise.
  • For open-ended questions, no marks should be awarded for YES/NO, or I AGREE/I DISAGREE. Equally no marks should be awarded for TRUE/FALSE or FACT/OPINION. The focus should be on the reason/substantiation/ motivation provided to support/justify the response.

5. PAPER 3 (WRITING)
NOTE: For additional information kindly refer to the Creative Writing Self Study Guide document available on the DBE website.
FORMAT, STRUCTURE AND MARK ALLOCATION OF QUESTION PAPER
5.1 Cover page
The cover page must contain the following information:
subject, level, paper, year, marks, time allocation and number of pages

Second Additional Language
Paper 3
November/June … (year of exam)
Marks: 80
Time: 2 ½ hours
This question paper consists of … pages. 

5.2 Instructions and information

  1. This question paper consists of THREE SECTIONS:
    SECTION A: Essay: (40)
    SECTION B: Longer Transactional Text (20)
    SECTION C: Shorter Transactional Text (20)
  2. Answer ONE question from EACH section.
  3. Write in the language in which you are being assessed.
  4. Start EACH section on a NEW page.
  5. You must plan (e.g. using a mind map/diagram/flow chart/key words), edit and proofread your work. The plan must appear BEFORE each text.
  6. All planning must be clearly indicated as such and handed in. It is advisable to draw a line through all planning.
  7. You are strongly advised to spend approximately:
    • 75 minutes on SECTION A
    • 38 minutes on SECTION B
    • 37 minutes on SECTION C
  8.  Number the answers correctly according to the numbering system used in this question paper.
  9. Give each response a suitable title/heading.
  10. Do NOT consider the title/heading when doing a word count.
  11. Write neatly and legibly.

5.3 SECTION A: ESSAY
QUESTION 1.1–1.8
Candidates will be expected to write ONE essay.
Length of essay
Disjunctive orthography: 200–250 words
Conjunctive orthography: 150–180 words
Types of essays to be set

  • Narrative
  • Descriptive

NOTE: Do NOT prescribe what type of essay a candidate should write on a topic.
Number of topics to be set
Eight topics, of which a minimum of three and a maximum of four should be visual stimuli.
Wording of topics
Topics should be concise and in language that is accessible to candidates.

  • Candidates are allowed to give their visual stimuli essays their own topics.
  • Flexibility must be exercised with wordy statements requiring an essay response to allow candidates to write only the question number rather than rewriting the entire statement.

NOTE: It is essential that a brief marking guideline accompanies the assessment rubric.
Weighting and rubrics
Essays will be assessed according to the following criteria:

CRITERIA  MARKS
Content and planning (60%)   24
Language, style and editing (30%)  12
Structure (10%)  4
TOTAL  40

Use the Assessment Rubric in APPENDIX A to assess candidates' essays.
Marking the creative writing:

An essay cannot be without any indication that it has been read and awarded marks accordingly. The final mark awarded on the essay must be justifiable.
Unlike the summary where there is a very strict word limit, an essay is creative work. If an essay is flowing in terms of creativity and captivating to the reader, it becomes unfair to focus only on the length at the expense of the content. The rule of thumb is that:
• No additional penalties may be imposed as the rubric itself imposes penalties.

5.4 SECTION B: LONGER TRANSACTIONAL TEXT
QUESTION 2.1–2.4
Length of texts
Disjunctive orthography (content only): 80–100 words
Conjunctive orthography (content only): 60–80 words
Types of texts
(Refer to the CAPS, page 75.)
FOUR questions will be set from the categories indicated below.
Category A:
Friendly letter/Formal letter (request/application/complaint/sympathy/congratulations/ thanks)
Category B:
Short report/review/speech/dialogue
NOTE:

  • Candidates will be expected to answer ONE question.
  • Visuals may be used only as supportive material.
  • The type of text required should be clearly indicated as a heading.

Wording of topics
Topics should be concise and in a language that is accessible to candidates.
Weighting and rubrics
Texts will be assessed on the following criteria:

CRITERIA  MARKS 
Content, planning and format (60%)   12
Language, style and editing (40%)  8
TOTAL  20

NOTE: The variety of formats applicable in transactional texts should be considered when assessing format. No one format should be considered as the only one acceptable.
Use the assessment rubric in APPENDIX B to assess candidates' longer transactional texts.
The marking guidelines must provide guidance regarding the nature, format and structure of a genre.
EXAMPLE:
Formal letter: Must have two addresses, salutation, heading, conclusion, etc.
5.5 SECTION C: SHORTER TRANSACTIONAL TEXT
QUESTION 3.1–3.3
Length of texts
Disjunctive orthography: 60–80 words
Conjunctive orthography: 40–60 words
Types of texts
(Refer to the CAPS, page 75.)
THREE questions will be set from each of the categories indicated below, ONE per question.
Category A:
Advertisement/Invitation card/Flyer/Poster
Category B:
Diary entries/Short Message System (SMS), namely: WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger etc.
Category C:
Instructions/Directions
NOTE:

  • Visuals may be used only as supportive material.
  • The type of text required should be clearly indicated as a heading.
  • Topics should be set in such a way that candidates will have the opportunity to write the required number of words.
  • Candidates' responses should be limited to written texts only.
  • No marks are awarded for pictures, sketches, etc.

Wording of topics
Topics should be concise and in language that is accessible to candidates.
Weighting and rubrics
Texts will be assessed on the following criteria:

CRITERIA  MARKS 
 Content, planning and format (60%)  12
 Language, style and editing (40%)  8
 TOTAL  20

NOTE: The variety of formats applicable in transactional texts should be considered when assessing format. No one format should be considered as the only one acceptable.
Use the assessment rubric in APPENDIX B to assess candidates' shorter transactional texts.
5.1 APPENDIX A: ASSESSMENT RUBRIC: ESSAY [40 MARKS]
NOTE:

  • Always use the rubric when marking the creative essay (Paper 2, Section A).
  • The marks from 0–40 have been divided into 5 major level descriptors.
  • The first TWO of the five level descriptors are divided into an upper and lower level divisions with the applicable mark range and descriptors.

(See the next page.)

Criteria    Exceptional  Skilful  Moderate  Elementary  Inadequate 
CONTENT & PLANNING
(Response and ideas)
Organisation of ideas for planning;
Awareness of purpose, audience and context
24 MARKS  
Upper level  22-24 18 12-16 7-11 0-6
  • Outstanding/Striking response beyond normal expectations
  • Intelligent, thought-provoking and mature ideas
  • Exceptionally well organised and coherent (connected), including introduction, body and conclusion/ending
  • Very well-crafted response
  • Fully relevant and interesting ideas with evidence of maturity
  • Very well organised and coherent (connected), including introduction, body and conclusion/ ending
  • Satisfactory response
  • Ideas are reasonably coherent and convincing
  • Reasonably organised and coherent, including introduction, body and conclusion/ending

 

 

  • Inconsistently coherent response
  • Unclear ideas and unoriginal
  • Little evidence of organisation and coherence

 

  • Totally irrelevant response
  • Confused and unfocused ideas
  • Vague and repetitive
  • Unorganised and incoherent
 

 

Lower level    19-21 17
  • Excellent response but lacks the exceptionally striking qualities of the outstanding essay
  • Mature and intelligent ideas
  • Skilfully organised and coherent (connected), including introduction, body and conclusion/ending
 
  • Well-crafted response
  • Relevant and interesting ideas
  • Well organised and coherent (connected), including introduction, body and conclusion
LANGUAGE, STYLE AND EDITING
Tone, register, style, vocabulary appropriate to purpose/effect and context;
Word choice;
Language use and conventions, punctuation, grammar, spelling
12 MARKS 
   10-12 8-9 6-7 4-5 0-3
  • Language excellent and rhetorically effective in tone
  • Virtually error-free in grammar and spelling
  • Skilfully crafted
  • Language engaging and generally effective
  • Appropriate and effective tone
  • Few errors in grammar and spelling
  • Well crafted
  • Adequate use of language with some inconsistencies
  • Tone generally appropriate and limited use of rhetorical devices
  • Inadequate use of language
  • Little or no variety in sentences
  • Exceptionally limited vocabulary
  • Language incomprehensible
  • Vocabulary limitations so extreme as to make comprehension impossible
STRUCTURE
Features of text;
Paragraph development and sentence construction
4 MARKS
  4 3 2 1 0
  • Excellent development of topic
  • Exceptional detail
  • Sentences, paragraphs exceptionally well-constructed
  • Logical development of details
  • Coherent
  • Sentences, paragraphs logical, varied
  • Relevant details developed
  • Sentences, paragraphs well-constructed
  • Essay still makes sense
  • Develop some valid points
  • Sentences and paragraphs faulty
  • Essay still makes some sense
  • Necessary points lacking
  • Sentences and paragraphs faulty
  • Essay lacks sense
33-40 28-30 20-25 12-17 0-9

 

5.2 APPENDIX B: ASSESSMENT RUBRIC: LONGER AND SHORTER TRANSACTIONAL WRITING (20 MARKS)

Criteria  Exceptional  Skilful  Moderate  Elementary  Inadequate 
CONTENT, PLANNING & FORMAT
Response and ideas;
Organisation of ideas for planning;
Purpose, audience, features/conventions and context
12 MARKS  
10-12 8-9 6-7 4-5  0-3
  • Outstanding response beyond normal expectations
  • Intelligent and mature ideas
  • Extensive knowledge of features of the type of text
  • Writing maintains focus
  • Coherence in content and ideas
  • Highly elaborated and all details support the topic
  • Appropriate and accurate format
 
  • Very good response demonstrating good knowledge of features of the type of text
  • Maintains focus – no digressions
  • Coherent in content and ideas, very well elaborated and details support topic
  • Appropriate format with minor inaccuracies
  • Adequate response demonstrating knowledge of features of the type of text
  • Not completely focused – some digressions
  • Reasonably coherent in content and ideas
  • Some details support the topic
  • Generally appropriate format but with some inaccuracies
  • Basic response demonstrating some knowledge of features of the type of text
  • Some focus but writing digresses
  • Not always coherent in content and ideas
  • Few details support the topic
  • Has vaguely applied necessary rules of format
  • Some critical oversights
  • Response reveals no knowledge of features of the type of text
  • Meaning is obscure with major digressions
  • Not coherent in content and ideas
  • Very few details support the topic
  • Necessary rules of format not applied
LANGUAGE, STYLE & EDITING
Tone, register, style, purpose/effect, audience and context;
Language use and conventions;
Word choice;
Punctuation and spelling
8 MARKS  
 7-8 5-6 4 3 0-2
  • Tone, register, style and vocabulary highly appropriate to purpose, audience and context
  • Grammatically accurate and well-constructed
  • Virtually error-free
  • Tone, register, style and vocabulary very appropriate to purpose, audience and context
  • Generally grammatically accurate and well-constructed
  • Very good vocabulary
  • Mostly free of errors
  • Tone, register, style and vocabulary appropriate to purpose, audience and context
  • Some grammatical errors
  • Adequate vocabulary
  • Errors do not impede meaning
  • Tone, register, style and vocabulary less appropriate to purpose, audience and context
  • Inaccurate grammar with numerous errors
  • Limited vocabulary
  • Meaning obscured
  • Tone, register, style and vocabulary do not correspond to purpose, audience and context
  • Error-ridden and confused
  • Vocabulary not suitable for purpose
    • Meaning seriously impaired
MARK RANGE 17-20 13-15 10-11 7-8 0-5


7. TYPES OF QUESTIONS AND COGNITIVE LEVELS
Using Barrett's Taxonomy, various types of questions will be set in such a way that ALL the cognitive levels are catered for in the proportions indicated:
Levels 1 and 2: 40% of total marks
Level 3: 40% of total marks
Levels 4 and 5: 20% of total marks
Barrett's Taxonomy

 LEVEL  DESCRIPTION  QUESTION TYPES 
 1 Literal (information in the text)  Example: Name the …; List the …; Identify the …; Describe the …; Relate the … 
 2 Reorganisation (analysis, synthesis or organisation of information)  Example: Summarise the main ideas …; State the differences/ similarities …
 3 Inference (engagement with information in terms of personal experience)  Example: Explain the main idea …; What is the writer's intention …; What do you think will be … 
 4 Evaluation (judgements concerning the value or worth)  Example: Do you think that …; Discuss critically …
 5 Appreciation (assess the impact of the text)  Example: Discuss your response …; Comment on the writer's use of language … 


7. ASSESSMENT IN LANGUAGES
7.1 COGNITIVE LEVELS
According to Barrett's Taxonomy of Reading Comprehension there are FIVE cognitive levels. In ascending order of complexity: Literal, Reorganisation, Inference, Evaluation and Appreciation. In Bloom's Taxonomy, the following SIX question categories are defined: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis and Evaluation.
While the overlaps in the two taxonomies are evident, the types of questions below provide examples of the cognitive levels as outlined in Barrett's Taxonomy.
7.2 TYPES OF QUESTIONS
Contextual Questions (Language and Literature Papers):
Contextual questions are set on a variety of selected texts (in the Language Paper) and on extracts from the prescribed texts (in the Literature Paper) to assess language competency and to gauge the extent of the insight and depth of understanding espoused in the NCS CAPS. The level of complexity depends on the level at which the language is being assessed, i.e. HL, FAL or SAL.
7.2.1 Literal
Questions that deal with information explicitly stated in the text:

  • Name the things/people/places/elements …
  • State the facts/reasons/points/ideas …
  • Identify the reasons/persons/causes …
  • List the points/facts/names/reasons …
  • Describe the place/person/character ...
  • Relate the incident/episode/experience …

7.2.2 Reorganisation
Questions that require analysis, synthesis or organisation of information explicitly stated in the text:

  • Summarise the main points/ideas/pros/cons …
  • Group the common elements/factors …
  • State the similarities/differences …
  • Give an outline of …

7.2.3 Inference
Questions that require a candidate's engagement with information explicitly stated in the text in terms of his/her personal experience:

  • Explain the main idea …
  • Compare the ideas/attitudes/actions …
  • What is the writer's (or character's) intention/attitude/motivation/ reason …
  • Explain the cause/effect of …
  • What does an action/comment/attitude, etc. reveal about the narrator/ writer/character …
  • How does the metaphor/simile/image affect your understanding …
  • What do you think will be the outcome/effect, etc. of an action/ situation …
  • True/False questions
  • Multiple-choice questions
  • Choose the correct option (from a given list)
  • Fill in the blanks (using contextual clues)
  • Questions on visual and graphic literacy

7.2.4 Evaluation
These questions deal with judgements concerning value and worth. These include judgements regarding reality, credibility, facts and opinions, validity, logic and reasoning, and issues such as the desirability and acceptability of decisions and actions in terms of moral values.

  • Do you think that what transpires is credible/realistic/ possible …?
  • Is the writer's argument valid/logical/conclusive …
  • Discuss/Comment critically on the action/intention/motive/attitude/ suggestion/implication …
  • Do you agree with the view/statement/observation/interpretation that …

7.2.5 Appreciation
These questions are intended to assess the psychological and aesthetic impact of the text on the candidate. They focus on emotional responses to the content, identification with characters or incidents, and reactions to the writer's use of language (such as word choice and imagery).

  • Discuss your response to the text/incident/situation/conflict/dilemma …
  • Do you empathise with the character? What action/decision would you have taken if you had been in the same situation?
  • Discuss/Comment on the writer's use of language …
  • Discuss the effectiveness of the writer's style/introduction/conclusion/ imagery/metaphors/use of poetic techniques/literary devices …

8. CONCLUSION
This Examination Guidelines document is meant to articulate the assessment aspirations espoused in the CAPS document. It is therefore not a substitute for the CAPS document which educators should teach to.
Qualitative curriculum coverage as enunciated in the CAPS cannot be over-emphasised.

Last modified on Friday, 25 June 2021 06:43