Monday, 07 June 2021 13:03

MUSIC PAPER 1 GRADE 12 MEMORANDUM - NSC PAST PAPERS AND MEMOS SEPTEMBER 2016

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MUSIC
PAPER ONE (P1)
GRADE 12 
EXAM PAPERS AND MEMOS
SEPTEMBER 2016

INSTRUCTIONS AND INFORMATION 

  1. This question paper consists of FIVE sections, namely SECTIONS A, B, C, D  and E.
  2. Answer SECTION A in pencil only in the spaces provided on this question  paper.
  3. Answer SECTION B and C or D or E in blue or black ink in the ANSWER  BOOK provided. 
  4. Number the answers correctly according to the numbering system used in this  question paper. 
  5. The last page of this question paper is manuscript paper intended for rough  work. You may remove this page. 
  6. You may NOT have access to any musical instrument for the duration of this  examination.
  7. Use the table on the next page as a guide for mark and time allocation when  answering each question. 
  8. Write neatly and legibly.

SECTION 

QUESTION 

MARKS 

MARKER 

MODERATOR

A: Theory of Music  (COMPULSORY) 

20

   

15

   

10

   

15

   

SUBTOTAL 

60

   

AND

B: (COMPULSORY) 

20

   

SUBTOTAL 

20

   

AND

C: WAM 

10

   
 

10

   
 

10

   
 

10

   

SUBTOTAL 

40

   

OR

D: JAZZ 

10 

10

   
 

11 

7

   
 

12 

8

   
 

13 

15

   

SUBTOTAL 

40

   

OR

E: IAM 

14 

10

   
 

15 

8

   
 

16 

7

   
 

17 

15

   

SUBTOTAL 

40

   

GRAND TOTAL 

120

   

MEMORANDUM

SECTION A: THEORY OF MUSIC (COMPULSORY) 
Answer QUESTION 1, QUESTION 2.1 OR QUESTION 2.2, QUESTION 3, AND  QUESTION 4.1 OR QUESTION 4.2. 
Answer the questions in the spaces provided on this question paper. QUESTION 1 
Study the extract from Oboe Sonata, Op. 166 by C. Saint Seans below and answer the  questions that follow.
33 Oboe Sonata Op. 166 by C. Saint Seans
1.1 Name the key of this extract. (1) 

D Major 

1.2 Name the type of triad at 1.2, for example diminished triad. (1) 

Major Triad OR B Major 

1.3 Give the intervals marked 1.3.1 and 1.3.2, for example major 2nd. (2) ie; (1) × (1)

1.3.1 (1)

Minor 7th

1.3.2 (1)

Minor 10th OR compound Minor 3rd 

1.4 Transpose the oboe part in bar 16 and 17 for Clarinet in Bb. Insert a new key  signature. 
34 TRANSPOSE Clarinet in Bb
Minus ½ a mark per mistake (8 x ½) (4) 
1.5 Re-write bar 7 of the piano part in half the note values. Insert a new time  signature. 
35 Re write bar 7 of the piano part
Minus ½ a mark per mistake 
½ a mark key signature 
½ a mark time signature 
½ a mark top part 
½ a mark bottom part (4 x ½) (2)

1.6 Improve the grouping in bars 10 and 11 of the oboe part. 
36 Improve the grouping in bars 10 and 11 o
Minus ½ a mark per mistake (4 x ½) (2)

1.7 Why are rests not used on beat 2 and 3 in the bass clef in bar 10? (1) 

The left hand notes/part is notated in the treble clef. 

1.8 Write the following scales or modes according to the given instruction: 

1.8.1 B Dorian mode, descending without key signature. Use the bass  clef and minums. 
37 1.8.1 B Dorian mode
Minus ½ a mark per mistake (6 x ½) (3) 
1.8.2 C melodic minor scale, ascending, with key signature. Use the alto  clef and minums.
38 1.8.2 C melodic minor scale as
Minus ½ a mark per mistake (12÷3) (4)

[20]

QUESTION 2 
ANSWER EITHER QUESTION 2.1 OR QUESTION 2.2. 
2.1 Use the opening motif below and complete a 12-bar melody in ABA-form for any  single-line melodic instrument of your choice. Indicate the instrument for which you  are writing and add dynamics and articulation marks, as well as a tempo indication. 
Instrument: 
39 ABA form for any
The melody will be marked according to the criteria below: 

DESCRIPTION 

MARK  

ALLOCATION

CANDIDATE’S  MARK

Instrument choice 

(Piano will not be accepted) 

1

 

Form and cadential points 

3

 

Musicality 

Melodic shape, climax, rhythm, musical unity and  creativity

8

 

Correct notation 

1

 

Dynamics and articulation 

2

 

TOTAL 

15

 

[15] 

OR

2.2 Use the opening motif below and complete a 12-bar melody in ABA-form for any  single-line melodic instrument of your choice. Indicate the instrument for which you  are writing and add dynamics and articulation marks, as well as tempo indication. 
Instrument: 
40 omplete a 12 bar melody in ABA form for any single line
The melody will be marked according to the criteria below: 

DESCRIPTION 

MARK  

ALLOCATION

CANDIDATE’S  

MARK

Instrument choice 

(Piano will not be accepted) 

1

 

Form and cadential points 

3

 

Musicality 

Melodic shape, climax, rhythm, musical unity and creativity

8

 

Correct notation 

1

 

Dynamics and articulation 

2

 

TOTAL 

15

 

[15]

QUESTION 3 
Study the extract from O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort by J.S. Bach below and answer the  questions that follow.
41 O Ewigkeit du Donnerwort by J.S. Bach below and answer th
3.1 Figure the chords marked (a) – (d) on the score. Use EITHER figuring  symbols below the score OR chord symbols above the score. Note the  example answer in bar 1. (4) 

(a) F: vi OR F: D minor 

(b) F: vii° OR F: E diminished 

(c) F: ii OR F: G minor 

(d) F: VI OR F: Bb major (4 x 1) 

3.2 Name the cadences at (e) and (f). Write only the name of the cadence below  the score in the block provided.  (2) 

(e) Imperfect cadence 

(f) Perfect cadence (2 x 1) 

3.3 Name the type of non-chordal notes at (g) to (i). (3)

(g) Lower auxiliary 

(h) Suspension 

(i) Unaccented passing note (3 x 1) 

3.4 Name the relative key (major or minor) of this extract.  (1) 

D minor 

[10]

QUESTION 4 
Answer EITHER QUESTION 4.1 (WAM) OR QUESTION 4.2 (JAZZ). 

4.1 Complete the four-part vocal harmonisation below by ading the alto, tenor and  bass parts. Use atleast TWO non-chordal notes. 
42 four part vocal harmonisation
The harmonisation will be marked according to the criteria below: 

DESCRIPTION 

MARK  

ALLOCATION

CANDIDATE’S  

MARK

Choice of chords

14 

(Minus ½ mark per  mistake)

 

Correctness 

Notation, doubling, spacing, voice leading and doubling

14 

(Minus ½ mark per  mistake)

 

Use of non-chordal notes 

2

 
 

30 (÷ 2)

 

TOTAL 

15 

 

[15] 

OR

4.2 Complete the piece below by adding suitable harmonic material in the bass clef. 
Ensure that you write in the style of Ragtime. 
43 e style of Ragtime.
The harmonisation will be marked according to the criteria below: 

DESCRIPTION 

MARK  

ALLOCATION

CANDIDATE’S  

MARK

Choice of chords

16 (2 per bar) 

(Minus ½ mark per  mistake)

 

Correctness 

Notation, spacing and voice leading

(Minus ½ mark per  mistake)

 

General impression 

6

 
 

30 (÷ 2)

 

TOTAL 

15 

 

[15] 
TOTAL SECTION A: 60

SECTIONS B, C, D, E: GENERAL MUSIC KNOWLEDGE 
Answer SECTION B (COMPULSORY) 
AND SECTION C (Western Art Music) 
OR SECTION D (Jazz) 
OR SECTION E (Indigenous African Music) 
Answer these questions in an ANSWER BOOK. 
SECTION B: GENERAL (COMPULSORY) 
QUESTION 5 
5.1 Four options are provided as possible answers to the following questions.  Choose the answer and write only the letter (A–D) next to the question number  in the ANSWER BOOK, for example 5.11 E. (10) 

5.1.1 C 

5.1.2 B 

5.1.3 C 

5.1.4 D 

5.1.5 D 

5.1.6 D 

5.1.7 C 

5.1.8 C  

5.1.9 D 

5.1.10 B (10 x 1) 

5.2

5.2.1 South African Music Rights Organisation (1) 
5.2.2 Protect musicians’ rights and collect money for songwriters in South  Africa and abroad. (1) 
5.2.3 2059 (Copyright last for 50 years post death) (1) 

5.3

  • Register the work with a collection agency
  • Post the work to yourself
  • A Commissioner of Oath can certify the work (3 x 1) (3)

5.4

5.4.1 True 
5.4.2 False 
5.4.3 True 
5.4.4 False (4 x 1) (4)

TOTAL SECTION B: 20

Answer SECTION C (Western Art Music) 
OR SECTION D (Jazz) 
OR SECTION E (Indigenous African Music) 
SECTION C: WESTERN ART MUSIC (WAM) 
QUESTION 6 
6.1 Beethoven composed 9 symphonies. (1)
6.2 They are both overtures. (1) 
6.3 A symphony is a large scale work in 4 or more movements while a  symphonic poem is a one movement work that is normally programmatic in  nature. (2) 
6.4 Free Masonary (1) 
6.5 The Wedding March OR A Midsummer Night’s dream OR the hymn tune  “Hark the Herald Angels Sing”. (2) 
6.6 Piano/Violin Sonata, Oratorio, Symphony, Chamber music (Any 2 x 1) (2) 
6.7 Opera seria refers to operas with a serious theme/story while opera comique is light hearted and comedic in nature. (2)

[10] 

QUESTION 7 
7.1

7.1.1 The name Mannheim School refers to a group of composers and  musicians that worked at the court of Duke Carl Theodor in  Mannheim, Germany, where the best composers where brought  together. (2) 
7.1.2 ∙

    • Melodic prominence given to the violins
    • Clarinet brought into orchestra 
    • Harpsichord no longer used 
    • Continuo part replaced by written parts for all instruments 
    • Addition of orchestral effects, e.g. the tremolo and broken chord in rapid notes. 
    • Replaced contrapuntal writing with homophonic texture
    • Effective use of crescendo and diminuendo. 
    • Established the sections of sonata form and the four-movement  symphony structure
    • The Minuet and Trio is added as the third movement. (Any 5 x 1) (5) 

7.2

7.2.1 B 
7.2.2 C 
7.2.3 A (3 x 1) (3)

[10]

QUESTION 8 
8.1 Use the following list of elements to write a paragraph on the style  characteristics of the Romantic period. 

  • Melody
    • Song-like melodies (Lyrical)
    • Wide leaps, e.g. 6ths, 7ths, diminished 
    • Augmented intervals are used for expressive purposes
    • Phrases not so regular and balanced as in the Classical Period - Melody with accompaniment frequently used (1)
  • Harmony 
    • Many dischords 
    • Chords used as a means of expressive colour 
    • Development of chromatic harmonies 
    • Freer use of non-harmonic tones and chromatic voice leading 
    • Often use 9th, 11th and 13th chords (1)
  • Tonality 
    • Sudden key changes were common 
    • Interchange of harmonies and keys from major to minor and vice versa was common 
    • Distant modulations, tonal ambiguity, and tendency to avoid 
    • distinct cadences (1)
  • Texture 
    • Use a wide range of pitch, dynamics and tone colours 
    • Dense textures were common 
    • Textures change within a piece (1)
  • Rhythm 
    • Freedom and flexibility of rhythm 
    • Rhythms tend to be less vital, and more focus on lyrical,  expressive melodies
    • Sometimes use movements based on one unbroken rhythmic  pattern and cross-rhythms (1) 

Any ONE characteristic for each element.

8.2 The Hebrides Overture Op. 26 is in B minor and written in sonata form.  The instrumentation consists of strings (Violin, viola, cello, double bass),  2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 trumpets and  timpani. (4)
8.3 The music was inspired by Mendelssohn’s boat trip to the Fingals cave on  the island of Staffa off the west coast of Scotland, which is known for its  weird echoes. (1)

[10] 

QUESTION 9 
First movement – Awakening of cheerful feelings on arrival in the  countryside. 

  • Time signature: 2/4 
  • Key: F major 
  • Form: Written in sonata form 

Any THREE of the following:

  • A leisurely movement in which the brook murmurs in quavers or semiquavers  almost throughout. 
  • The first subject is built up of five figures, which are used throughout the  movement. 
  • Scored for flute, oboe, clarinet in Bb, bassoon, horn and strings 

Fourth Movement – Thunderstorm 

  • Time signature: 4/4
  • Key: F minor 
  • Form: Programme music 

Any THREE of the following:

  • The 4th movement depicts a violent thunderstorm with painstaking realism,  building from just a few drop or rain to a great climax with thunder, lightning,  high winds and sheets of rain. The storm eventually passes with an  occasional peal of thunder still heard in the distance. There is a seamless  transition into the final movement.
  • The pp staccato quavers played by the violins in bar 3 give the effect of the  first raindrops.
  • The drums enter for the first time in bar 21, representing the first big roll of  thunder.
  • Two additional trombones enter for the first time in bar 106 giving additional  strength when the storm reaches its climax.
  • The storm reaches its climax with tremolos and drum rolls. 

2 Marks for language and style

(16 ÷1.6) [10] 
TOTAL SECTION C: 40

OR 

SECTION D: JAZZ 
QUESTION 10 
10.1 New Orleans (1)
10.2 The Jazz Epistles (1)
10.3 Dolly Rathebe, Thandi Klaasen (2)
10.4 Kwela, a pennywhistle-based street music developed in South Africa. (1)
10.5 Fusion (1)
10.6 Piano (1)
10.7 The Blue Notes (1)
10.8

10.8.1 Pata Pata (1) 
10.8.2 1989 (1)

[10] 

QUESTION 11 

  • Known as one of the greatest pennywhistlers in South Africa.
  • Performed/composed in Kwela style: Kwela is a pennywhistle-based street  music. This style developed in South Africa blending with the music of  Malawian immigrants. Uses simple chord progressions which are made up  mostly of primary chords (I, IV, and V).
  • Spokes claims that the inspiration for his songs come from his dreams.
  • Albums included King Kwela, Ace Blues, Kwela Spokes, Chobolo, Sono  Sam. (Only ONE album)

[7]

QUESTION 12 
12.1

  • Voice is a jazz quintet consisting of some of South Africa’s leading jazz  musicians. The group includes musicians such as Andile Yenana (Piano),  Sydney Mnisi (Saxophone), Marcus Wyatt (Trumpet), Herbie Tsoaeli  (Bass), Morabo Morojele (Drums).
  • Voice is inspired by early jazz musicians such as Abdullah Ibrahim. There  compositions are in Marabi and Kwela styles. They are also influenced by bebop and Latin Jazz. (4) 

12.2

12.2.1 True 
12.2.2 True 
12.2.3 False 
12.2.4 False (4 x 1) (4)

[8] 

QUESTION 13 

  • The Jazz Epistles were made up of 6 members. It included Dollar Brand, later  known as Abdullah Ibrahim (Piano), Kippie Moeketsi (Alto Saxophone), Jonas  Gwangwa (Trombone), Hugh Masekela (Trumpet), Johnny Gertze (Bass) and  Early Mabuza OR Makaya Ntshoko (Drums).
  • They were the first important Bebop band in South Africa. Bebop is a style of jazz  characterised by a fast tempo, instrumental virtuosity and improvisation.
  • This style began during the mid-1940’s in the USA and aimed to counter the  popular swing style of the time with a new non-danceable style of music. 
  • The music contained advanced harmonies, complex syncopation and the role  of the rhythm section was expanded. During the apartheid system, jazz offered  a way to protest against the political system of the time. The South African  government made numerous attempts at suppressing the music by controlling  radio broadcasts and raiding jazz clubs.
  • First album by Jazz Epistles was ‘Jazz Epistle, Verse 1

[15]
TOTAL SECTION D: 40

OR 

SECTION E: INDIGENOUS AFRICAN MUSIC (IAM) 
QUESTION 14 
14.1 Chordophone (1) 
14.2 A singer, storyteller, praise singer that presents a series of important  events through song or praise or narrative. (2) 
14.3 An ululation is a long, wavering, high-pitched vocal sound resembling a  howl with a trilling quality. (1) 
14.4 Mbaqanga (1) 
14.5 The mixed structural form is a combination of call and response, call and  refrain and call and chorus refrain. An ending sentence/phrases is not used  to respond to the call. (2) 
14.6 Beatboxing (1) 
14.7

  • Comprises of eight to ten “pipe blowers” and three drum beaters.
  • Lyrics are in many different languages including isiZulu, Shona and  Northen Ndebele, Sepedi. (2)

[10]

QUESTION 15 
Definition of the word 

  • The word originates from the Zulu word ‘Cothoza’ which means to ‘walk on one’s toes lightly’. 
  • It was originally sung by the workers in the early Natal Province where they held  competitions amongst each other. 
  • It is known as a Zulu style that is just as famous as maskanda music. ∙ Isicathamiya was made famous by the SA group, Ladysmith Black Mambazo.
  • The word ‘Isicathamiya’ is derived from the word cathama which means to crawl  like a cat or walk on your toes as the workers were compelled to practice their  dance moves softly in the evenings. (2) 

Characteristics of the music 

  • It is in the style of a capella harmonious singing. It is a style where men sing  without accompaniment. 
  • Uses call and response between the leader and the group. 
  • Singing generally in four parts. 
  • Vocal techniques such as crepitation and ululation. 
  • Lyrics mostly in isiZulu and choreography is derived from traditional isiZulu  dancing. (4) 

ONE important album and its composer(s) 

  • Ladysmith Black Mambazo (Shaka Zulu/Long walk to Freedom/Journey of  Dreams/Gift of the Tortoise/Songs from Zulu-Farm)  (2) 

Any 1 album 

[8] 

QUESTION 16 
Style/Characteristics 

  • Afro Soul is the term given to the music genre that is a fusion between soul  music (A style that combines elements of gospel, rhythm and blues and jazz)  and African music. (3)

Instrumentation 

  • A distinct feature of Afro Soul is the strong influence of vocals. The instrumentation consists mainly of drums, bass, guitar and vocal (AND  backing vocals) (4 ÷ 2) (2) 

TWO artists 

  • Artists such as Hugh Masekela and Mirriam Makeba composed in an Afro Soul  style. (2)

[7]

QUESTION 17 
Cultural origins (any TWO) 

  • Maskandi means a virtuoso instrumentalist who plays traditional music on  Western instruments.
  • Traditionally maskandi music consists of a song evolving with the singers’  (usually a male singer) real life experiences, his daily joys etc.
  • The term Maskanda comes from the Afrikaans word “musikant” which means  musician, and is associated with Zulu folk music. 
  • Maskandi is a kind of Zulu folk music that has evolved within South African  society, particularly in Kwazulu-Natal. (2) 

Typical instrumentation 

  • Typical instrumentation consists of a concertina, acoustic guitar, bass guitar,  keyboards, synthesizer, drums and backing vocalists. Normally associated with  the guitar. (5) 

Style characteristics of the music 

  • Traditional songs begin with a flourish on the guitar or accordion and is referred  to as “izihlabo” – “This is what I am going to play and this is who I am.” 
  • The guitar is not tuned the same as the traditional tuning. Lyrical content  includes praise, storytelling and migrant culture. 
  • People dance, play drums and clap hands in different ways and the dances that  is portrayed signifies the district or area where the maskandi orginated. 
  • The frontman’s natural personality is a key element in the music. 
  • Use of rapidly spoken sections of Zulu praise poetry, called “izibongo”.
  • Known as “Zulu Blues”, because of the cyclical repetitive and picking strings on  the guitar. (5) 

THREE artists that were influential in exposing Maskandi to the international  market. 

  • Artists like Johnston Zibokwakhe Mnyandu, Bhodloza Nzimande, Amatshitshi  Amhlophe, Amashayina Amahle, Siyani Ngcobo, Imithente, Inkunzi Emdaka and  Izingane Zoma contributed in exposing Maskandi to the international market. (3)

[15] 
TOTAL SECTION E: 40 
GRAND TOTAL: 120

Last modified on Friday, 13 August 2021 12:54