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DESIGN PAPER 1 GRADE 12 MEMORANDUM - NSC EXAMS PAST PAPERS AND MEMOS NOVEMBER 2018

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DESIGN
PAPER 1
GRADE 12 
NSC EXAMS
PAST PAPERS AND MEMOS NOVEMBER 2018

MEMORANDUM 

SECTION A: DESIGN LITERACY 
'UNSEEN' EXAMPLES 
ANSWER EITHER QUESTION 1.1 OR QUESTION 1.2. 
QUESTION 1 [10 Marks] 
1.1
1.1.1 (Allocate 8 marks) 

  • Colour: The poster in FIGURE A uses a polychromatic scheme consisting of  bold, warm rusts, olive-green, lime-green and a cool grey-blue creating a fun  and joyful mood. ๐Ÿ—น These colours echo the poster's title which instructs the  viewer to 'have fun on foot'. ๐Ÿ—น The colourful images are placed on white  clouds which heightens their richness. ๐Ÿ—น The whiteness of the clouds speaks  of purity and freshness. ๐Ÿ—น The white may also be symbolic of the lightness  (weight-wise) of the sandal. ๐Ÿ—น
  • Contrast: The figurative images on the white cloud background are detailed  and outlined making them stand out. ๐Ÿ—น They contrast with the plain, flat, light  olive-green background and light turquoise abstract, geometric patterns,  images of rainbows and scribbly curvilinear patterns. ๐Ÿ—น This contrast  activates the surface and conveys a sense of festivity. ๐Ÿ—น The designer's use  of different mediums โ€“ the photographed suede and leather of the Tsonga  Tslops contrast with the cartoon-like illustrations.๐Ÿ—น A further contrast is seen  in the use of large, three-dimensional typography and smaller, flat or two dimensional words. ๐Ÿ—น The left hand side of the poster has natural images  (elephant, tree, bird, aloe plant) which contrasts with the right hand side of  the poster which has mostly man made items (traditional vessels, sandal and  traditional hat worn by the woman). ๐Ÿ—น The large size of the sandal in the  middle ground, contrasts with the medium size of the typography in the  foreground and the small illustrations in the background. Therefore  highlighting the sandal in the poster. ๐Ÿ—น
  • Focal Point: The main focal point is the Tsonga Tslops sandal because it is  the largest image ๐Ÿ—น and it is in the middle of the composition. ๐Ÿ—น The poster used a real photograph of the Tsonga Tslops sandal and the textural  qualities of the suede and leather that draws your attention. ๐Ÿ—น The bold dark  brown colour of the sandal is emphasized as it contrasts with the white  clouds and the bright lime-green of the background. ๐Ÿ—น
  • Unity: In FIGURE A, unity is created by the repeated use of rust, olive  greens, sea green, chocolate brown, grey-blue and white colours. The  repetition of geometric decorations ๐Ÿ—น and black outlines also unify the work.  ๐Ÿ—น The white clouds on multiple levels hold and unify all the images. ๐Ÿ—น The  Tsonga Tslops sandal also touches all the clouds and images thus creating  unity of motifs. ๐Ÿ—น The overlapping of objects unites the illustration. ๐Ÿ—น

1.1.2 (Allocate 2 marks) 
'Unity in diversity' is achieved in this poster because cultural symbols that  come from the different cultural groups in South Africa have been used.๐Ÿ—น The cultural symbols include the aloe plant which is a sacred plant used in  communication with the ancestors, ๐Ÿ—น the elephant which is a symbol of  strength and wisdom to the South African, ๐Ÿ—น the traditional African vessels  which are often used to store water, beer or fresh produce from the field or  market and ๐Ÿ—น the Zulu woman dressed in the traditional hat (isicholo) worn  by married women. ๐Ÿ—น The different symbols signifying the different cultural  groups in the poster come together on the group of fluffy clouds, in therefore  the clouds can be seen to represent the unity of the multitude of diverse  cultural groups in South Africa. ๐Ÿ—น  
Some learners may also argue that the poster only refers to a few  mainstream cultures and therefore does not express 'unity in diversity'. ๐Ÿ—น 
Credit must be given to any other valid statements. 

Q.1.1  LEVEL

COGNITIVE SKILLS 

WEIGHTING 

QUESTIONS 

MARKS (10)

Lower Order 

Remember, Recall, Recognise 

30%

1.1.1 

2

Understand, Explain, Describe 

1.1.1 

1

Middle Order 

Apply, Implement, Organise 

40% 

1.1.1 

1.1.2

1

Higher Order 

Analyse, Interpret

30%

1.1.1 

2

Reflect, Judge 

1.1.2 

1

Synthesis

   

OR 
1.2 [Allocate a maximum of 2 marks per design term for a total of 10 marks] 

  • BIOMIMICRY
    The seat and legs of the chair are organic in form to ensure comfort. ๐Ÿ—น The  bottom of the hind leg to the top of the back rest emulates the form and  structure of a reptile from tail to head and helps to strengthen the structure. ๐Ÿ—น The cabriole legs mimic the short, stubby curved legs of reptiles. ๐Ÿ—น 
  • ERGONOMICS
    The chair reflects the form and proportions of the human body to ensure that it  supports the human body in a comfortable and safe manner.๐Ÿ—น The height of  the chair will allow the average person to sit with their feet firmly on the ground  with their legs bent at the knee at a 45 degree angle. ๐Ÿ—น
  • FORM
    In FIGURE B, the chair's form is considered amorphous because it is organic  ๐Ÿ—น and lacks the conventional rectangular form normally associated with a  chair, a seat with four legs.๐Ÿ—น Instead the chair has three legs and the sitting  area has a more organic form.๐Ÿ—น The back rest is also amorphous in character  that shows undulating form reminiscent of carved stone or replicating the form  of reptile skin. ๐Ÿ—น
  • TEXTURE
    The texture of FIGURE B is actual and tactile. ๐Ÿ—น The back of the chair is  rough and knobbly and crafted to create a scale-like texture that resembles a  crocodile reptile.๐Ÿ—น In contrast, the seating area is smooth and polished,  reminiscent of bone, to assure comfort.๐Ÿ—น
  • BALANCE
    The chair is asymmetrically balanced when viewed from the side profile. This enhances the aesthetic experience of the design. ๐Ÿ—น The chair appears to be  unbalanced with the weight not being proportionally distributed. ๐Ÿ—น If the chair  is viewed from the front, it appears to be symmetrically balanced with the left  hand side being a mirror image of the right hand side. ๐Ÿ—น The chair is balanced  because of the back leg which is thicker. ๐Ÿ—น 

Credit must be given to any other valid statements

Q.1.2  LEVEL

COGNITIVE SKILLS 

WEIGHTING 

QUESTIONS 

MARKS (10)

Lower Order 

Remember, Recall, Recognise 

30%

1.2 

1

Understand, Explain, Describe,  Classify

1.2 

2

Middle Order 

Apply, Implement, Organise 

40% 

1.2 

4

Higher Order 

Analyse, Interpret

30%

1.2 

1

Reflect, Judge 

1.2 

1

Synthesis, Justify 

1.2 

1

COMMUNICATION THROUGH DESIGN
QUESTION 2 [10 marks] 
2.1 (Allocate 6 marks) 
Images with symbolic meaning include but not restricted to: 

  • The Protea ๐Ÿ—น can be seen to symbolise the natural beauty of South Africa as  it is our national flower.๐Ÿ—น
  • The 'Kaapse Klopse'๐Ÿ—น singer in the front is both a symbol of the Cape Malay  cultural identity and of festivities and celebration of Cape Town. ๐Ÿ—น
  • The image of Table Mountain ๐Ÿ—น with the sun setting behind is a symbol of the  wonders of the world as it has been voted one of the Seven Wonders of the  World. It also is a symbol of South Africa's natural beauty.๐Ÿ—น
  • The bunch of grapes ๐Ÿ—น symbolises the wine industry in South Africa. ๐Ÿ—น 
  • The Aids ribbon๐Ÿ—น symbolises aids awareness and community  consciousness.๐Ÿ—น
  • The Madiba ๐Ÿ—น shirt symbolises pride in the African heritage.๐Ÿ—น  The circle of pattern around Mandela's head๐Ÿ—น could be seen as a halo and   gives him a saintly quality.๐Ÿ—น
  • Mandela is a symbol of peace. ๐Ÿ—น He brought unity and peace to South Africa.  ๐Ÿ—น
  • The penguin ๐Ÿ—น, which symbolises endangered species. ๐Ÿ—น 

2.2 Credit must be given to any other valid statements. 
(Allocate 2 marks) 
The colours of the shirt are rich, bright and varied communicating a rich spirit and  also appear to be a celebration of life.๐Ÿ—น The contrast between the monochromatic  head of Mandela and the shirt intensifies the brightness of the shirt which draws  attention to Mandelaโ€™s unique dress sense. ๐Ÿ—น The sepia colours used to portray  Mandela lend a seriousness and gravity to his person, ๐Ÿ—น juxtaposed against the  colourful shirt that embraces fun and frivolity. ๐Ÿ—น 
2.3 (Allocate 2 marks) 
The poster in FIGURE C could be seen to be biased in favour of the Western  Cape as only the cultures and natural beauty of that province is portrayed. ๐Ÿ—น None of the other cultural symbols and natural beauties from other provinces is portrayed. ๐Ÿ—น Mandela is perceived as an inclusive figure that promotes cultural  diversity and should be visually represented as such.๐Ÿ—น The use of Mandela to  represent our country is also biased as there are other heroes that can justly  represent our country. ๐Ÿ—น The halo above Mandelaโ€™s head is biased as it portrays  him as a saintly individual, although Mandela was a human being prone to human  weaknesses. ๐Ÿ—น There is a gender and race imbalance; there are only males 
(Mandela and the man with the umbrella) not including the whole rainbow nation. ๐Ÿ—น 
Credit must be given to any other valid statements.

Q.2  LEVEL

COGNITIVE SKILLS 

WEIGHTING 

QUESTIONS 

MARKS (10)

Lower Order 

Remember, Recall, Recognise,  Name 

30% 

2.1 

2

Understand, Explain, Describe,  Classify

2.1 

1

Middle Order 

Apply, Implement, Organise 

40% 

2.1 

2.2

1

Higher Order 

Analyse, Compare, Interpret

30%

2.2 

1

Evaluate, Reflect, Judge 

2.3 

2

QUESTION 3 [10 marks] 
ANSWER EITHER QUESTION 3.1 OR QUESTION 3.2. 
3.1 Allocate 10 marks in total 
Both the teapot forms in FIGURE D and E are three-dimensional. Hennie Meyer's  Teapot (FIG D) is, organic, curvilinear and sensual ๐Ÿ—น whereas the form of the  teapot in FIGURE E is geometric, abstract and machine-like. ๐Ÿ—น Meyer's teapot is  an embellished form that conceals its function whereas Brandt's teapot is  minimalist revealing its function. ๐Ÿ—น Brandt's teapot is typical of Bauhaus products  as the form is guided by the 'Form Follows Function' concept. ๐Ÿ—น As opposed to Meyer's that has a busy surface pattern and form.  
Hennie Meyer's Postmodernist Teapot is produced by hand and each teapot he  creates is unique and different. ๐Ÿ—น This production method and use of ceramic clay  lends itself to the visibility of finger-marks and imperfections.๐Ÿ—น Marianne Brandt's  teapot is mass-produced by a machine. ๐Ÿ—น There are no imperfections visible as  the product is carefully investigated afterwards for any defects. Both teapots are a  clear reflection of exquisite craftsmanship and unique production methods created  with different techniques. ๐Ÿ—น 
Hennie Meyer's teapot is made from clay, a medium that is pliable, relatively  cheap and readily available. ๐Ÿ—น After the teapot is made and decorated it is fired in  a kiln to make the clay impermeable. The medium is fragile and breakable. ๐Ÿ—น Marianne Brandt's teapot, on the other hand, is made from stainless steel and  black ebony wood to create a strong, durable, shiny, smooth product, hence the  title 'Silver and Ebony'. ๐Ÿ—น These materials are heat resistant and able to keep the  tea warm for a longer period. ๐Ÿ—น The chrome silver colour will not fade over time  and the teapot only needs to be cleaned with soap and water โ€“ no polishing is  needed. The designer follows the 'Truth to Materials' philosophy. ๐Ÿ—น 
Hennie Meyer's teapot is highly ornate. A variety of patterns and textures are used  to decorate the bulk of the teapot's body giving it a complex and rich surface.๐Ÿ—น The  patterns and textures are applied by hand creating an earthy character.๐Ÿ—น Marianne  Brandt's machine-produced teapot is void of any decoration and is more  impersonal, focusing on the quality of the materials. ๐Ÿ—น 
Hennie Meyer's teapot is clearly inspired by nature. The teapot resembles a plant  or a bird's beak. ๐Ÿ—น The decorations are inspired by African geometric patterns and  naรฏve childlike drawings. ๐Ÿ—น The eclectic form and decorations of the teapot are Art  Deco, Aztec zig-zag or Postmodernist inspired. ๐Ÿ—น The product is layered, pluralistic  and complex. ๐Ÿ—น Marianne Brandt's teapot is clearly inspired by Bauhaus machine  aesthetics. The teapot integrates many Bauhaus and De Stijl characteristics, for  example the cold and impersonal Dutch philosophy of mathematical order (in  combining geometric forms) is evident. ๐Ÿ—น
Credit must be given to any other valid statements. 
NOTE: A maximum of ONLY 3 marks may be allocated for tabular  comparison responses. Use the cognitive level grid as a guideline for your  marking 

Q.3.1 LEVEL

COGNITIVE SKILLS 

WEIGHTING 

QUESTIONS 

MARKS 

(10)

Lower Order 

Remember, Recall, Recognise 

30%

3.1 

1

Understand, Explain, Describe 

3.1 

2

Middle Order 

Apply, Implement, Organise 

40% 

3.1 

4

Higher Order 

Analyse, Compare, Interpret

30%

3.1 

1

Evaluate, Reflect 

3.1 

1

Create, Synthesise 

3.1 

1

OR 
3.2 [10 marks] 
(Allocate 4 marks) 
3.2.1 The Temple of Hercules in FIGURE G has a geometrical circular structure with a cylindrical stone cella which is an inner chamber that is surrounded by  a circular colonnade of Corinthian pillars that orbit around it. ๐Ÿ—น The structure of the Bosjes chapel in FIGURE F is based on a square glass  chamber which is dominated by a floating, organic concrete shell roof  structure that undulates above the glass walls. ๐Ÿ—น  
The tall columns of FIGURE G give the structure a lofty appearance which  is enhanced by the structure of the cylindrical pointed roof. ๐Ÿ—น The  structure of the body of FIGURE F is in the form of a cube of transparent  glass which is contrasted by a concrete roof that rises and falls in a sinuous  undulating form giving the impression of freedom, reminding one of a bird in  flight or a stingray swimming. ๐Ÿ—น
The Roman temple of Hercules in FIGURE G shows strong Greek  influences as it is purported to have been designed by the Greek architect  Hermodoras of Salamina during the latter part of the 2nd century BCE and it  is a monopteros - a round temple of Greek 'peripteral' design completely  encircled by a colonnade. ๐Ÿ—น The South African countryside influences the  design of FIGURE F designed by Steyns' studio in 2016. Surrounded by  majestic mountains the sinuous roof mimics a bird in flight and dramatically  affords views of the surrounding mountains through the glazed/glass walls of  the chapel. ๐Ÿ—น Inspired by the manner in which the Cape Dutch Manor  houses set up a dialogue with their environment through their typical  undulating gables and white washed walls, the bright white canopy of the  Bosjes chapel creates a sculptural relationship with the mountains. ๐Ÿ—น In  FIGURE G Roman design is influenced and is an evolution of previous  styles and successfully combines new innovation and materials with existing  design elements from civilizations they conquered. ๐Ÿ—น 
NOTE: A maximum of ONLY 1 mark may be allocated to tabular  comparison responses. 
(Allocate 6 marks) 
3.2.2 The material used in FIGURE F for the undulating roof is cast concrete  which creates a free-flowing space. ๐Ÿ—น This advanced technology allows  the concrete shell to appear simple, unifying and as structurally efficient as  possible. ๐Ÿ—น The roof also becomes the walls/columns with the use of  parabolic and hyperbolic arches. ๐Ÿ—น The Temple of Hercules, in FIGURE G, 
makes use of a classical Greek building material, Pentelic marble which is  mined near Athens in Greece. At the time of construction Pentelic marble  was one of the more expensive building materials and was rarely used for  large projects. ๐Ÿ—น The columns, entablature and cella walls were all  constructed with Pentelic marble blocks whilst the inner cella walls were  lined with tufa and stucco.๐Ÿ—น Tufa is a variety of limestone formed when  carbonate minerals precipitate out of ambient temperature water and stucco  is a form of plaster. ๐Ÿ—น The construction of the building makes use of typical  1st century Roman architectural technology. This is evident in the  construction of the capitals that are made from two separate pieces. A  single block is used to carve the base and plinth of the column and the base  is integrated into the first step of the podium. ๐Ÿ—น 
Inspired by the ancient Greek monopteroi or round temple which was a  circular colonnade supporting a roof but without any walls, FIGURE G  functioned as the Roman temple of Hercules. ๐Ÿ—น This obscured the view of  the idol contained within the temple and functioned as a more protective  private space.๐Ÿ—น In contrast to this confined space of the Bosjes Chapel,  FIGURE F functions as a protective space that embraces the congregation  through transparent glass walls allowing for an uncluttered view throughout the chapel.๐Ÿ—น FIGURE F would also appeal to a broader cross section of a  modern society๐Ÿ—น in contrast to FIGURE G which was more exclusive in  function by only including a smaller section of the population. ๐Ÿ—น 
Credit must be given to any other valid statements or a comparison of  a classical and contemporary building that the candidate has studied. 
NOTE: A maximum of ONLY 3 marks may be allocated to tabular  comparison responses. Use the cognitive level grid as a guideline for  your marking. 

Q.3.2 LEVEL

COGNITIVE SKILLS 

WEIGHTING 

QUESTIONS 

MARKS (10)

Lower Order 

Remember, Recall, Recognise 

30%

3.2.1 

2

Understand, Explain, Describe, Classify 

3.2.2 

1

Middle Order 

Apply, Implement, Organise 

40% 

3.2.2 

4

Higher Order 

Analyse, Compare, Interpret

30%

3.2.1 

2

Evaluate, Reflect

   

Create, Synthesise, Justify 

3.2.2 

1

TOTAL SECTION A: 30 

SECTION B: DESIGN HISTORY 
QUESTION 4 [30 marks] 
4.1 Allocate 20 marks in total) 
(Allocate 10 marks for each movement. Please note that only one mark  can be allocated for the name of a designer and product for each  movement. Please use the cognitive level grid as a guideline for your  marking.) 
This marking guideline supplies an answer for the following two possibilities:
SCANDINAVIAN DESIGN AND BAUHAUS 
Candidates may choose any two movements as long as their statements are  justified and relate to the quote. 
Candidates could, for example, choose Scandinavian Design that reflect the quote  in FIGURE H.  
Scandinavian designers aim to create functional products that are well crafted  and well finished ๐Ÿ—น and at the same time they aim to create aesthetically pleasing,  beautiful products that reflect elegance, fun and simplicity. ๐Ÿ—น Scandinavian Design  can therefore be seen to fit with the quotation in FIGURE H. 
The organic forms of their designs as well as the use of light wood as a material  show the influence of nature. ๐Ÿ—น The use of simple, functional designs with clean  lines and smooth surfaces reflects the influence of the machine aesthetic of the  Bauhaus and Modernism. ๐Ÿ—น The influence of Surrealist artists like Miro can be  seen in the flattening of organic forms into abstract, biomorphic shapes that add  an element of fun to the design. ๐Ÿ—น This careful choice of influences to link with  their aims is further proof that these designers are not just interested in the  functionality of their products but also in their aesthetic appeal. ๐Ÿ—น 
Forms are simple and organic with smooth surfaces and clean lines expressing  modernity and lightness. ๐Ÿ—น Other characteristics include colours that are neutral and calm or bright, cheerful, bold and fresh. ๐Ÿ—น Textiles make use of bold, stylised  flower motifs and patterns. ๐Ÿ—น New materials dominate such as fibreglass, rubber,  plastic, vinyl, plywood, aluminium and chrome in their need to create low-cost  solutions to modern needs. ๐Ÿ—น 
Arne Jacobsen's 'Ant Chair' ๐Ÿ—น is an example of Scandinavian Design's use of  modern materials. It is manufactured from a single piece of laminated wood and its  legs are from chrome. ๐Ÿ—น Its curvilinear outline and biomorphic, ant- inspired shape  reflects their interest in using nature as inspiration. ๐Ÿ—น The chair is carefully  planned to be functional but at the same time stylish and elegant. ๐Ÿ—น 
Candidates could choose Bauhaus design that reflects the quote in FIGURE I.
Bauhaus designers clearly reject 'confusion and clutter' in their aim to create  simple and functional designs that reflect the machine age. ๐Ÿ—น Bauhaus design can  therefore be seen to fit with the quotation in FIGURE I. The school aimed to train  craftsman-designers to design functional, aesthetically pleasing products for mass production. ๐Ÿ—น They believed that form should follow function and that any  unnecessary detail would detract from the expression of the function of a product.  ๐Ÿ—น Their 'truth to materials' philosophy can be seen in their use of unpainted,  exposed materials like steel, e.g. steel tubing on a chair. ๐Ÿ—น 
Bauhaus design is influenced by the De Stijl belief in eliminating all non-essential  characteristics or 'clutter' in order to find the most essential forms, lines and  colours. ๐Ÿ—น Paul Cezanne's flattening of form to geometric facets ๐Ÿ—น and the  Constructivists use of geometric abstraction and belief in maximum reduction are  also influences on Bauhaus. ๐Ÿ—น 
Like De Stijl, Bauhaus designers favoured basic, pure, geometric forms, straight  lines and smooth surfaces to create impersonal, machine-like products. ๐Ÿ—น Colours  are reduced to the primary colours (yellow, red and blue) and the neutral colours  (black, grey and white) to support the general aim of simplicity. ๐Ÿ—น 
Wilhelm Wagenfeldt's 'Bauhaus lamp' ๐Ÿ—น is a good example of an 'uncluttered' Bauhaus design as it is made up of only geometric forms and shapes (the main  body of the lampshade is a perfect half sphere, the base is a perfect circular disc  and the leg is a cylinder tube). ๐Ÿ—น The surface is smooth and unadorned exposing  the function of the lamp clearly. ๐Ÿ—น The silver of the stainless steel, the white of the  frosted shade and the clear glass are all neutral colours exuding calmness. ๐Ÿ—นThe  clear glass contrast with the frosted white and silver adding some drama. ๐Ÿ—น 
Credit must be given to any other valid statements.

Q.4.1 LEVEL

COGNITIVE SKILLS 

WEIGHTING 

QUESTIONS 

MARKS (20)

Lower Order 

Remember, Recall, Recognise, Name 

30%

4.1 

2

Understand, Explain, Describe, Classify 

4.1 

4

Middle Order 

Apply, Implement, Organise 

40% 

4.1 

8

Higher Order 

Analyse, Compare, Interpret

30%

4.1 

2

Evaluate, Reflect 

4.1 

1

Create, Synthesise, Justify 

4.1 

3

4.2 [10 marks] 
The Art Nouveau book cover in FIGURE J reflects the influences of the intricate,  intertwining lines of Viking stone carving as well as Viking imagery๐Ÿ—น , whereas the  Modernist book cover in FIGURE K reflects the influences of the Machine Age's  use of straight lines, geometric shapes and smooth, undecorated surfaces. ๐Ÿ—น 
Like the Arts and Crafts movement, Art Nouveau also aims to establish close links  between the artist and craftsman and to transfer the quality of handmade products  to their designs. ๐Ÿ—น The embossed, intricate details on the book cover in FIGURE J  reflect a handmade quality. ๐Ÿ—น Modernist designers, on the other hand, aim to  create aesthetically pleasing designs that are simple, abstract and 'geometricised' for mass-production by machine. ๐Ÿ—น This aim is evident in the Modernist book cover  where forms are abstract, simple, machine-like and impersonal. ๐Ÿ—น 
The rich and exotic use of colour in FIGURE J is typical of Art Nouveau. ๐Ÿ—น The  background is a dusky dark blue with a rich gold decorative swirling pattern  embossed on it. ๐Ÿ—น The Modernist book cover in FIGURE K uses a steel grey  background and the red and white geometric linear image creates a strong  contrast. ๐Ÿ—น 
The lines on the Art Nouveau book cover are typical of Art Nouveau as they are  curvilinear and organic creating a highly decorative, rhythmic surface pattern. ๐Ÿ—น In  contrast, the lines on the Modernist book cover are straight, sharp, geometric and  clean, which convey control and machine-like rigidity. ๐Ÿ—น The lines of the Art  Nouveau book cover have a feminine feel with whiplash fluidity whereas the  Modernist book design lines are more masculine, machine-like. ๐Ÿ—น 
The shapes of the Art Nouveau book cover are organic and flattened, simplified  and stylized, reflecting the influence of Japanese art. ๐Ÿ—น The shapes of the  Modernist book cover are also simplified but they are abstract instead of  representational like those on the Art Nouveau book cover. ๐Ÿ—น The Modernist book  cover makes use of perspectival lines to create optical illusions of three dimensional form as opposed to the flat shapes of the Art Nouveau book cover. ๐Ÿ—น 

Q.4.2 LEVEL

COGNITIVE SKILLS 

WEIGHTING 

QUESTIONS 

MARKS 

(10)

Lower Order 

Remember, Recall, Recognise,  Name 

30%

4.2 

1

Understand, Explain, Describe,  Classify

4.2 

2

Middle Order 

Apply, Implement, Organise 

40% 

4.2 

4

Higher Order

Analyse, Compare, Interpret

30%

4.2 

1

Evaluate, Reflect, Judge 

4.2 

1

Create, Synthesise, Justify 

4.2 

1

TOTAL SECTION B: 30

SECTION C: SOCIO-CULTURAL/ENVIRONMENTAL AND SUSTAINABLE CONTEXT
QUESTION 5 [20 marks] 
ANSWER EITHER QUESTION 5.1 OR QUESTION 5.2. 
5.1 [20 marks] 
5.1.1 (Allocate 6 marks) 
(Allocate 2 marks) 

  • COMPOSITION
    The arrangement of the object is formal. It is large and centrally placed  within a simple symmetrical grid of two blocks emphasising the meaning.  ๐Ÿ—น The poster is vertically split to emphasise different realities: violence  versus passiveness. ๐Ÿ—น The object becomes a focal point in drawing the  viewer's attention on violence.๐Ÿ—น The composition is asymmetrical leading  the eye from left to right, from the handle of the gun horizontally towards  the loud speaker. ๐Ÿ—น The curve of the trigger, leads the eye towards the  typography in the middle of the poster. ๐Ÿ—น 

(Allocate 2 marks) 

  • SYMBOLISM 
    The revolver symbolises war and violence whilst the loudspeaker  symbolises peace and nonviolence through the medium of speech. ๐Ÿ—น The  colour scheme of the object of war (the revolver) is dark, dreary and  depressing symbolising the devastation of war on society ๐Ÿ—น whereas the  loudspeaker is light and bright symbolising hope and a voice.๐Ÿ—น 

(Allocate 2 marks) 

  • USE OF IMAGERY
    Juxtaposing images are used in the poster. ๐Ÿ—น The size of the images is exaggerated, particularly with the size of the revolver that is manipulated  to fit and merge with the loudspeaker.๐Ÿ—น Both images are relevant in  highlighting the message of the poster with the revolver representing war and violence and the loudspeaker representing a voice and peace. ๐Ÿ—น 

Credit any other valid statements.
5.1.2 Allocate 14 marks in total 
(Allocate 7 marks per case study) 
Allocate 1 mark for the name of the designer and the name of the  product.  
ONE CONTEMPORARY SOUTH AFRICAN DESIGNER/DESIGN  GROUP: 
The Growbag, by Bonsela, (South Africa), 2015๐Ÿ—น is a unique outdoor  planter that offers an easy and attractive way to grow your own  vegetables, herbs, plants and succulents, regardless of the size of the  garden, balcony, driveway or wall and roof space.๐Ÿ—น Growbag has partnered with Soil for Life to start the Grow to Life  Programme to teach communities who live in harsh environments with  limited space and resources various techniques of growing their own  organic gardens using water wise and low cost methods. ๐Ÿ—น Through these  gardens their families are ensured adequate nutrition combating the  sociocultural problem of hunger.๐Ÿ—น Statistics indicate that 14 million people  go to bed hungry in South Africa. The Growbag and Soil for Life initiative also encourages communities in their Grow to Life programme to  generate an income from their gardens. ๐Ÿ—น In this way they address poverty and impart entrepreneurial skills to unemployed individuals. ๐Ÿ—น Each Growbag is individually handmade hence the manufacturing of the  Growbag also empowers individuals by creating employment.๐Ÿ—น The Growbag is made out of reinforced, old billboard vinyl skins that are  durable and hence long lasting.๐Ÿ—น Extra growing and storage space is also  provided by the side pockets.๐Ÿ—น The Growbag is donated to  underprivileged communities in Cape Town.๐Ÿ—น The Growbag project eradicates hunger caused by the inaccessibility of land for subsistence farming, in impoverished communities i.e. informal settlements and  townships.๐Ÿ—น Growbag addresses the above mentioned sociocultural  concerns by providing a flexible, lightweight gardening solution.๐Ÿ—น
ONE CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL DESIGNER/DESIGN  GROUP: 
GravityLight by, Jim and Martin of SkunkWorks projects, designed in  2009, Kenya.๐Ÿ—น GravityLight is a low-cost solar light that uses energy from a falling weight  to illuminate homes that are off-grid and living on less than R40 a day.๐Ÿ—น The light is a revolutionary new approach to storing energy and creating  illumination. GravityLight was created as a sustainable alternative to  paraffin lamps.๐Ÿ—น The light combines kinetic and potential energy, by  connecting an elevated weight โ€” filled with rocks or sand โ€” to a pulley  system that slowly powers a generator as the weight falls to the ground. It  takes only 3 seconds to lift the weight which powers an LED bulb,  creating 30 minutes of light on its descent.๐Ÿ—น Because the Gravitylight provides an alternative to the paraffin light, it  eliminates the health dangers and environmental drawbacks caused by  paraffin lamps. The use of paraffin causes 3% of the world's CO2 emissions and is a significant source of black carbon, which impacts on  the environment.๐Ÿ—น The smoke from the use of paraffin lamps also causes  respiratory problems, which is equivalent to smoking two packets of  cigarettes a day. ๐Ÿ—น The fumes also cause eye infections and cataracts.๐Ÿ—น Accidental paraffin poisoning also has potentially fatal consequences,  particularly for children. Using paraffin inside homes can lead to  devastating fires and burns. Burning paraffin also comes with a financial  burden that can consume 10 to 20% of a household's income.๐Ÿ—น The GravityLight Foundation boosts the local economy by creating a  sustainable demand for clean, safe lighting solutions.๐Ÿ—น Through the field  sales team and working with local partners in Kenya, GravityLight supports Kenyans to earn a living and learn new skills by selling  GravityLights.๐Ÿ—น Because there are no running costs after the initial low  cost purchase, GravityLight has the potential to lift people out of poverty,  allowing them to use the money they have saved to buy more effective  lighting systems in the future.๐Ÿ—น The project was initially self-funded by NLE and then by Lagos State, it later received research funds from Heinrich Boll Stiftung as well as funds  for its construction from the UNDP/Federal Ministry of Environment Africa  Adaptation Programme (AAP).
Credit any other valid statements. 

Q.5.1 LEVEL

COGNITIVE SKILLS 

WEIGHTING 

QUESTIONS 

MARKS 

(20)

Lower Order 

Remember, Recall, Recognise,  Name 

30% 

5.1.1 

2

Understand, Explain, Describe,  Classify

5.1.2 

4

Middle Order 

Apply, Implement, Organise 

40% 

5.1.1 

5.1.2

4

Higher Order 

Analyse, Compare, Interpret

30%

5.1.2 

3

Evaluate, Reflect, Judge 

5.1.2 

2

Create, Synthesise, Justify 

5.1.2 

1

OR 
5.2 [20 marks] 
5.2.1 (Allocate 2 marks) 
The role of indigenous craft in modern day society is to pay homage to  indigenous cultures because many indigenous crafts are embedded in  traditional cultural practices.๐Ÿ—น The use of indigenous crafts in modern day  society also assists in the continuation of or passing down of knowledge  and skills from one generation to another. ๐Ÿ—น The continued practice of  traditional crafts in modern day society also helps people to connect and  express their cultural identities.๐Ÿ—น 
5.2.2 (Allocate 8 marks) 
Learners can discuss any indigenous craft, e.g. Ndebele House Painting 
The Ndebele people were formidable warriors who often subdued the  smaller chiefdom's and assimilated them into Ndebele society.  Intermarriages ensued and cultural exchanges happened. It is believed  that early Ndebele house structure and house-painting strategies came  into being as a result of the abovementioned intercultural marriages. ๐Ÿ—น The initial wall art designs and symbolic forms were derived from Ndebele  beadwork forms and pattern motifs.๐Ÿ—น Consequently, after the Ndebele  people were defeated by the Boer farmers in the Boer war in the twentieth  century, the Ndebele also started using the expressive symbols in their  wall paintings to secretly communicate with each other.๐Ÿ—น These  messages were not interceded by the Boer because they were thought to  be just a form of cultural art and hence decorative and harmless.๐Ÿ—น Ndebele house painting is done by women and the craft is passed down  from one generation to the next.๐Ÿ—น Usually, the outside gates of the  household, front walls, side walls and interior of the home is painted.๐Ÿ—น Traditionally, a well painted house serves as a form of communication  conveying the role and social status of the female of that household.๐Ÿ—น  In the context of the above discussion Ndebele house painting is  significant as an expression of traditional continuity and cultural resistance  against colonisation.๐Ÿ—น It is also a way of passing down heritage  knowledge and traditional customs from one generation to the next.๐Ÿ—น  Prior to the introduction of acrylic pigments in South Africa in the 1940s,  only natural pigments were used in Ndebele house paintings.๐Ÿ—น These  included monochrome ochres, browns, black and limestone whitewash.๐Ÿ—น The walls where then subsequently seasonally repainted, after the  summer rainfalls had washed and eroded away the natural pigments.๐Ÿ—น The women applied the pigments to the wall using just their fingers.๐Ÿ—น 
A description of ONE work, as well as the name(s) of the cultural  group/craftsperson that produced it. 
Allocate 1 mark to the name of the indigenous cultural  group/craftsperson 
Ndebele wall paintings ๐Ÿ—น 
Ester Mahlangu's traditional wall paintings at the Mahlangu household in  KwaNdebele, are characterised by symbolic geometric shapes with bold  black cloissonistic outlines. ๐Ÿ—น The flat geometric shapes are in a variety of  colours ranging from red, dark red browns, sky blue, deep blue, white,  yellow gold, green and the occasional pink. ๐Ÿ—น The combination of the  geometric shapes, primary and complementary colour schemes create a  rhythmic pattern on the surface of the wall. ๐Ÿ—น These wall paintings were  used to secretly communicate information and knowledge about various  issues dealing with resistance, colonialism, tradition and heritage. ๐Ÿ—น 
5.2.3 (Allocate 10 marks) 
Allocate 1 mark only for the name of the designer and name of  product. 
Ashanti Design lampshades by Robert Walker. ๐Ÿ—น 
Ashanti Designs in Cape Town by Robert Walker aims to celebrate and  pay tribute to traditional crafts in a contemporary way.๐Ÿ—น Ashanti Designs' design ethic is heavily influenced African heritage, a sustainable design  ethic and biomorphic forms.๐Ÿ—น The materials and technique used to construct the Ashanti Designs' lampshades are heavily influenced by Zulu basketry.๐Ÿ—น Particularly, two  varieties of the Zulu baskets, the lidded variety that is mainly used for  storage and the flat ones that are used for chaffing wheat.๐Ÿ—น Traditionally  these baskets were decorated using elaborate arrangement of geometric  motifs to create unique zigzag patterns.๐Ÿ—น  Characteristically these lampshades are created using pliable materials  such as, soft branches, grass, palm fronds, fibres, raffia, fibrous tree and  plant roots. ๐Ÿ—น These materials are then hand manipulated using the  plaiting, twining and chequer board weaving techniques to create the  lampshade. ๐Ÿ—น  Socio-culturally, Ashanti Designs empower craftsmen in rural areas by  selling their products that teaches these craftsmen valuable  entrepreneurial skills.๐Ÿ—น Ashanti Designs also seeks to promote and  preserve African Heritage by using African traditional craft techniques to  create products that have a function and hence a place in contemporary  South Africa.๐Ÿ—น 

Q.5.2 LEVEL

COGNITIVE SKILLS 

WEIGHTING 

QUESTIONS 

MARKS 

(20)

Lower Order 

Remember, Recall, Recognise, Name 

30%

5.2.2 

5.2.3

4

Understand, Explain, Describe, Classify

   

Middle Order 

Apply, Implement, Organise 

40% 

5.2.2 

5.2.3

4

Higher Order 

Analyse, Compare, Interpret

30%

5.2.1 

2

Evaluate, Reflect 

5.2.2 

2

Create, Synthesise, Justify 

5.2.3 

2

QUESTION 6 6.1 [20 marks] 
6.1.1 (Allocate 4 marks) 
The poster aims to inform the public/tourist of the damaging effect that  plastic waste has on our environment โ€“ in this case, specifically in relation  to elephants.๐Ÿ—น 
The elephant appears to be strangled by the twisted plastic bottle looking  like a helpless victim.๐Ÿ—น The plastic bottle is depicted much larger than the  elephant, overpowering it. This shows the destructive power of plastic โ€“ even though in reality it is a small lightweight bottle, its caustic properties  are so destructive that it can destroy one of the biggest animals in Africa.๐Ÿ—น The text 'Time is running out for them, not for plastic' is in a simple, san  serif type, bringing the direct, emotive message successfully across in a  dreary grey colour.๐Ÿ—น  The discarded plastic water bottle is squashed to resemble an hourglass  and the elephant becomes a symbol of life slipping away because of  pollution.๐Ÿ—น The large, empty grey monochromatic background makes  reference to a damaged earth which is polluted, dirty, and barren leaving  humanity with a bleak future.๐Ÿ—น 
6.1.2 (Allocate 2 marks) 
To recycle means to make new products from non-biodegradable  materials that could potentially damage the environment and in so doing  prevent them from being discarded on landfills or polluting the earth. ๐Ÿ—น By  recycling these materials, the amount of new material production is cut  down, resulting in less energy consumption and less carbon dioxide and  other toxic fumes or gases being released into the atmosphere. ๐Ÿ—น To up cycle means to adapt and elevate existing materials and products that are  no longer in use. Up-cycle implies that the material and product can  function again in another context with a different and a higher purpose. ๐Ÿ—น 
OR 
Upcycling is energy efficient process, involving the reusing of waste  without destroying it in order to form something new. ๐Ÿ—นRecycling takes  waste products breaks them down then forms them into something new. ๐Ÿ—น 
Credit any other valid statements.
6.2 Allocate 14 marks in total 
(Allocate 7 marks per case study) 
Allocate 1 mark for the name of the designer and the name of the product.
EXAMPLE OF A SOUTH AFRICAN DESIGNER: 
Heath Nash, Don't complain, what you see is what you get, South Africa, 2011.๐Ÿ—น Don't complain, what you see is what you get is collaboration between Nash and  local Zimbabwean artisans that resulted in a colourful and vibrant use of local  resources combined with local craft traditions. The aim of the plastic bottle shades created by Nash is to create shaded areas under which people can congregate, sit, relax and talk to each other.๐Ÿ—น They can  also be used for public kiosks from which vendors can sell flowers and  refreshments.๐Ÿ—น The shades were designed to integrate well with the existing  architectural elements of the urban Harare landscape.๐Ÿ—น Nash's design process involves an exploration of waste materials, plastic bottles  of all shapes, colours and sizes.๐Ÿ—น Scrap metal and wood is also utilised.๐Ÿ—น A roof  is constructed from a metal frame that is secured with wire to keep the plastic  bottles together.๐Ÿ—น In some instances, the frame is constructed from wood and  metal scraps and aluminium cans are cut and woven to create textural  coverings.๐Ÿ—น The shades are an example of the type of products Nash designs using discarded  material deemed to be rubbish.๐Ÿ—น This project uses bottles that are washed and cut, the unused excess pieces are sent back to the recyclers.๐Ÿ—น The project helps  to clean the environment and to reduce the carbon footprint.๐Ÿ—น 
EXAMPLE OF AN INTERNATIONAL DESIGNER: 
Ocean sole turns flip-flop pollution into art and functional products, for example key holders in the shape of fish or life-size cows and lion heads. ๐Ÿ—น The material Ocean Sole uses is discarded flip flops which they have removed from  the ocean and waterways in Kenya. This has provided a steady income to over  150 low-income Kenyans. They aim to promote conservation of our oceans. ๐Ÿ—น Their aim is to give back to society and change the lives of many through  education, income and meals. ๐Ÿ—น Ten per cent of their revenue is donated to marine conservation programmes.  Ocean Sole makes fun art so that people, companies and charities will  remember that the Ocean needs to be clean from pollution.๐Ÿ—น Their pieces  remind people of the trash found in the oceans and waterways that is killing  human and marine life in its journey from the dumps to the beaches. ๐Ÿ—น  The material source is readily available in that in emerging warm-climate  markets, billions of cheap flip-flops are made for the feet of the poor every day. ๐Ÿ—น These flip-flops are worn for a year, at the most and then after many repairs  are discarded into dumpsites that ultimately seep into our Earth's waterways and  then into our oceans. ๐Ÿ—น The mass of discarded flip-flops pile up and block  waterways of fresh water and then make their way to our oceans, killing  everything in their way. ๐Ÿ—น Tons of flip-flop pollution is washing up onto the  beaches everyday creating an environmental disaster for the marine eco-system  and local communities. Using discarded flip flops is a sustainable practice for  reducing pollution. ๐Ÿ—น  Ocean Sole Founder Julie Church, was inspired by the toys children were  making out of discarded flip-flops and encouraged mothers to collect, wash, and  cut the discarded flip-flops. ๐Ÿ—น The process she designed was to heat various  colours of flip-flops into a malleable state and then press them into moulds. This  process creates colourful products such as key rings and fun art sculptures e.g.  the head of a lion and even a life size cow. ๐Ÿ—น  A company was established to promote 'trade not aid' to raise awareness of flip flop pollution.๐Ÿ—น This year Ocean Sole has transformed over 50 tons of discarded  and lost flip-flops that were found in the ocean and on land and up-cycled them  into artworks.

Q.6 LEVEL

COGNITIVE SKILLS 

WEIGHTING 

QUESTIONS 

MARKS (20)

Lower Order 

Remember, Recall, Recognise,  Name 

30%

6.1.1 

2

Understand, xExplain, Describe,  Classify

6.1.2 

6.2

3

Middle Order 

Apply, Implement, Organise 

40% 

6.1.1 

6.1.2 

6.2

5

Higher Order 

Analyse, Compare, Interpret

30% 

   

Evaluate, Reflect, Judge 

6.2 

2

Create, Synthesise, Justify 

6.2 

4

TOTAL SECTION C:  40
GRAND TOTAL:   100

Last modified on Wednesday, 15 September 2021 09:20